UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Velocity-dependent changes of time, force and spatial parameters in Warmblood horses walking and trotting on a treadmill


Weishaupt, M A; Hogg, H P; Auer, J A; Wiestner, T (2010). Velocity-dependent changes of time, force and spatial parameters in Warmblood horses walking and trotting on a treadmill. Equine Veterinary Journal, 42(Sup.38):530-537.

Abstract

Reasons for performing study: Gait analysis parameters are sensitive to alterations in velocity. For comparison of nonspeed-matched data, the velocity dependency needs to be known.

Objectives: To describe the changes in gait pattern and determine the relationships between stride duration, vertical impulse, contact time and peak vertical force within a range of walking and trotting speeds.

Methods: Thirty-eight nonlame Warmblood horses were subjected to an incremental speed test. The spans of speed were adjusted individually to each horse and ranged from 1.1–2.1 m/s at walk and from 2.5–5.8 m/s at trot. Time, force and spatial parameters of each limb were measured with an instrumented treadmill and analysed with regression analysis using velocity as the independent variable.

Results: At a slow walk the shape of the force curve was generally single-peaked in the fore- and trapezoidal in the hindlimbs. With increasing speed, the curves turned into the typical double-peaked shape with a higher second peak in the fore- and a higher first peak in the hindlimbs. With increasing velocity, stride duration, stance durations and limb impulses of the fore- and hindlimbs decreased in both gaits (r2>0.92). Increasing speed caused a weight shift to the forehand (walk: from 56 to 59%; trot: from 55 to 57%). Despite decreasing limb impulses, peak vertical forces increased in both gaits (r2>0.83). The suspension duration of the trot increased with faster velocities and reached a plateau of around 90 ms at the highest speeds. At a slow trot, the forelimbs impacted first and followed the hindlimbs at lift-off; with increasing speed, the horses tended to impact earlier with the hindlimbs. Contralateral symmetry indices of all parameters remained unchanged.

Conclusions: Subject velocity affects time, force and spatial parameters. Knowing the mathematical function of these interdependencies enables correction of nonspeed-matched data.

Reasons for performing study: Gait analysis parameters are sensitive to alterations in velocity. For comparison of nonspeed-matched data, the velocity dependency needs to be known.

Objectives: To describe the changes in gait pattern and determine the relationships between stride duration, vertical impulse, contact time and peak vertical force within a range of walking and trotting speeds.

Methods: Thirty-eight nonlame Warmblood horses were subjected to an incremental speed test. The spans of speed were adjusted individually to each horse and ranged from 1.1–2.1 m/s at walk and from 2.5–5.8 m/s at trot. Time, force and spatial parameters of each limb were measured with an instrumented treadmill and analysed with regression analysis using velocity as the independent variable.

Results: At a slow walk the shape of the force curve was generally single-peaked in the fore- and trapezoidal in the hindlimbs. With increasing speed, the curves turned into the typical double-peaked shape with a higher second peak in the fore- and a higher first peak in the hindlimbs. With increasing velocity, stride duration, stance durations and limb impulses of the fore- and hindlimbs decreased in both gaits (r2>0.92). Increasing speed caused a weight shift to the forehand (walk: from 56 to 59%; trot: from 55 to 57%). Despite decreasing limb impulses, peak vertical forces increased in both gaits (r2>0.83). The suspension duration of the trot increased with faster velocities and reached a plateau of around 90 ms at the highest speeds. At a slow trot, the forelimbs impacted first and followed the hindlimbs at lift-off; with increasing speed, the horses tended to impact earlier with the hindlimbs. Contralateral symmetry indices of all parameters remained unchanged.

Conclusions: Subject velocity affects time, force and spatial parameters. Knowing the mathematical function of these interdependencies enables correction of nonspeed-matched data.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
17 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

3 downloads since deposited on 20 Jan 2011
1 download since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:20 Jan 2011 18:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0425-1644
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2042-3306.2010.00190.x
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-42206

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations