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Ascorbic acid improves embryonic cardiomyoblast cell survival and promotes vascularization in potential myocardial grafts in vivo


Martinez, E C; Wang, J; Gan, S U; Singh, R; Lee, C N; Kofidis, T (2010). Ascorbic acid improves embryonic cardiomyoblast cell survival and promotes vascularization in potential myocardial grafts in vivo. Tissue Engineering. Part A, 16(4):1349-1361.

Abstract

Organ restoration via cell therapy and tissue transplantation is limited by impaired graft survival. We tested the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA) reduces cell death in myocardial grafts both in vitro and in vivo and introduced a new model of autologous graft vascularization for later transplantation. Luciferase (Fluc)- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were seeded in gelatin scaffolds to form myocardial artificial grafts (MAGs). MAGs were supplemented with AA (5 or 50 mumol/L) or plain growth medium. Bioluminescence imaging showed increased cell photon emission from day 1 to 5 in grafts supplemented with 5 mumol/L (p < 0.001) and 50 mumol/L (p < 0.01) AA. The amount of apoptotic cells in plain MAGs was significantly higher than in AA-enriched grafts. In our in vitro model, AA also enhanced H9C2 cell myogenic differentiation. For in vivo studies, MAGs containing H9C2-GFP-Fluc cells and enriched with AA (n = 10) or phosphate-buffered saline (n = 10) were implanted in the renal pouch of Wistar rats. At day 6, postimplantation bioluminescence signals decreased by 74% of baseline in plain MAGs versus 36% in AA-enriched MAGs (p < 0.0001). AA grafts contained significantly higher amounts of blood vessels, GFP(+) donor cells, and endothelial cells. In this study, we identified AA as a potent supplement that improves cardiomyoblast survival and promotes neovascularization in bioartificial grafts.

Organ restoration via cell therapy and tissue transplantation is limited by impaired graft survival. We tested the hypothesis that ascorbic acid (AA) reduces cell death in myocardial grafts both in vitro and in vivo and introduced a new model of autologous graft vascularization for later transplantation. Luciferase (Fluc)- and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing H9C2 cardiomyoblasts were seeded in gelatin scaffolds to form myocardial artificial grafts (MAGs). MAGs were supplemented with AA (5 or 50 mumol/L) or plain growth medium. Bioluminescence imaging showed increased cell photon emission from day 1 to 5 in grafts supplemented with 5 mumol/L (p < 0.001) and 50 mumol/L (p < 0.01) AA. The amount of apoptotic cells in plain MAGs was significantly higher than in AA-enriched grafts. In our in vitro model, AA also enhanced H9C2 cell myogenic differentiation. For in vivo studies, MAGs containing H9C2-GFP-Fluc cells and enriched with AA (n = 10) or phosphate-buffered saline (n = 10) were implanted in the renal pouch of Wistar rats. At day 6, postimplantation bioluminescence signals decreased by 74% of baseline in plain MAGs versus 36% in AA-enriched MAGs (p < 0.0001). AA grafts contained significantly higher amounts of blood vessels, GFP(+) donor cells, and endothelial cells. In this study, we identified AA as a potent supplement that improves cardiomyoblast survival and promotes neovascularization in bioartificial grafts.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:15 Jan 2011 10:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Publisher:Mary Ann Liebert
ISSN:1937-3341
Additional Information:This is a copy of an article published in Tissue Engineering. Part A. © 2010 copyright Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.; Tissue Engineering. Part A is available online at: http://www.liebertonline.com.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1089/ten.TEA.2009.0399
PubMed ID:19908964
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-42299

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