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Real life cardio-thoracic surgery training in Europe: facing the facts


Sádaba, J R; Loubani, M; Salzberg, S P; Myers, P O; Siepe, M; Sardari Nia, P; O'Regan, D J (2010). Real life cardio-thoracic surgery training in Europe: facing the facts. Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, 11(3):243-246.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the current status of training in cardio-thoracic surgery in Europe and the residents' perception of the effects of the full implementation of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on training. We conducted a web-based survey of trainees registered with the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and 79 respondents form the basis for this analysis. A majority of trainees (69.6%) are aware of the implications of the EWTD and 58.7% believe it will have an impact on their training. Most residents (98.7%) work well over the time limitations stated in the Directive and 96.2% are of the opinion that a 48-hour week would be insufficient to meet their learning needs. A large proportion (60.5%) of European trainees are dissatisfied with their training and report low-levels of regular assessment of their progress (37.8%) and of training facilities (27.4%). Only 23.3% of European trainers appear to attend training courses. Striking differences exist among European countries with regards to standards of training. These findings are alarming. Training in cardio-thoracic surgery across the European Union requires urgent attention to unify and improve the standards of training and compensate the potential negative impact of the EWTD.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the current status of training in cardio-thoracic surgery in Europe and the residents' perception of the effects of the full implementation of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on training. We conducted a web-based survey of trainees registered with the European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery and 79 respondents form the basis for this analysis. A majority of trainees (69.6%) are aware of the implications of the EWTD and 58.7% believe it will have an impact on their training. Most residents (98.7%) work well over the time limitations stated in the Directive and 96.2% are of the opinion that a 48-hour week would be insufficient to meet their learning needs. A large proportion (60.5%) of European trainees are dissatisfied with their training and report low-levels of regular assessment of their progress (37.8%) and of training facilities (27.4%). Only 23.3% of European trainers appear to attend training courses. Striking differences exist among European countries with regards to standards of training. These findings are alarming. Training in cardio-thoracic surgery across the European Union requires urgent attention to unify and improve the standards of training and compensate the potential negative impact of the EWTD.

Citations

9 citations in Web of Science®
10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Cardiovascular Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:15 Jan 2011 11:35
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Publisher:European Association of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
ISSN:1569-9285
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1510/icvts.2010.238048
PubMed ID:20554650

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