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Recognition of potentially novel human disease-associated pathogens by implementation of systematic 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the diagnostic laboratory


Keller, P M; Rampini, S K; Büchler, A C; Eich, G; Wanner, R M; Speck, R F; Böttger, E C; Bloemberg, G V (2010). Recognition of potentially novel human disease-associated pathogens by implementation of systematic 16S rRNA gene sequencing in the diagnostic laboratory. Journal of Clinical Microbiology, 48(9):3397-3402.

Abstract

Clinical isolates that are difficult to identify by conventional means form a valuable source of novel human pathogens. We report on a 5-year study based on systematic 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We found 60 previously unknown 16S rRNA sequences corresponding to potentially novel bacterial taxa. For 30 of 60 isolates, clinical relevance was evaluated; 18 of the 30 isolates analyzed were considered to be associated with human disease.

Clinical isolates that are difficult to identify by conventional means form a valuable source of novel human pathogens. We report on a 5-year study based on systematic 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We found 60 previously unknown 16S rRNA sequences corresponding to potentially novel bacterial taxa. For 30 of 60 isolates, clinical relevance was evaluated; 18 of the 30 isolates analyzed were considered to be associated with human disease.

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6 citations in Web of Science®
8 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:16 Jan 2011 10:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Publisher:American Society for Microbiology
ISSN:0095-1137
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1128/JCM.01098-10
PubMed ID:20631113

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