UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Transmission pathways of vibratory stimulation as measured by subjective thresholds and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions


Watanabe, T; Bertoli, S; Probst, R (2008). Transmission pathways of vibratory stimulation as measured by subjective thresholds and distortion-product otoacoustic emissions. Ear and Hearing, 29(5):667-673.

Abstract

To clarify the contribution of the skull contents to the transmission of bone vibratory stimuli, and to examine the characteristics of such stimuli, we compared auditory thresholds and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels with a bone vibrator placed on various sites of the head, including the eye. The best audiometric thresholds and the highest DPOAE levels were obtained with the vibrator placed on the mastoid of the measuring side, or on the "ultrasound-window" of the temple. The audiometric thresholds obtained with the bone vibrator on the eye were similar to those of the forehead, and about 10 dB higher than at the best sites. DPOAEs were clearly present when elicited by a combination of air-conducted stimuli presented through an insert earphone and with the bone vibrator placed on the eye. These results indicate that vibratory sounds can be transmitted through the skull contents to the inner ear. The intracranial transmission pathway of the vibratory stimuli may play a significant role, particularly at low frequencies, and possibly also when the vibratory stimuli are applied on the skull bone.

To clarify the contribution of the skull contents to the transmission of bone vibratory stimuli, and to examine the characteristics of such stimuli, we compared auditory thresholds and distortion-product otoacoustic emission (DPOAE) levels with a bone vibrator placed on various sites of the head, including the eye. The best audiometric thresholds and the highest DPOAE levels were obtained with the vibrator placed on the mastoid of the measuring side, or on the "ultrasound-window" of the temple. The audiometric thresholds obtained with the bone vibrator on the eye were similar to those of the forehead, and about 10 dB higher than at the best sites. DPOAEs were clearly present when elicited by a combination of air-conducted stimuli presented through an insert earphone and with the bone vibrator placed on the eye. These results indicate that vibratory sounds can be transmitted through the skull contents to the inner ear. The intracranial transmission pathway of the vibratory stimuli may play a significant role, particularly at low frequencies, and possibly also when the vibratory stimuli are applied on the skull bone.

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
22 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:24 Oct 2008 07:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:29
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0196-0202
Publisher DOI:10.1097/AUD.0b013e3181775dde
PubMed ID:18596647

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations