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Hearing loss and fluctuating hearing levels in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia


Pantel, G; Probst, R; Podvinec, M; Gürtler, N (2009). Hearing loss and fluctuating hearing levels in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia. Journal of Laryngology and Otology, 123(1):136-140.

Abstract

Background and objective:X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia is the most common of the genetically determined forms of osteomalacia. The occurrence of hearing loss in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia has been known since 1984. However, observations on the progression of such hearing loss, and suggestions regarding possible therapy, have not previously been published.Methods:Case report of a patient with X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and hearing loss, with three years' audiological follow up, description of empirical therapy and literature review.Results:The patient presented with fluctuating hearing. An audiogram showed mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss mainly in the low and high frequencies. A temporary improvement of 20-40 dB after steroid therapy was observed. Four weeks later, hearing had deteriorated again, mainly in the low frequencies. After one year of fluctuating hearing levels, stabilisation occurred.Conclusions:In X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia, hearing loss occurs predominantly in the low and high frequencies. The hearing loss type and progression pattern point to an endolymphatic hydrops as the pathogenetic mechanism. Steroid therapy may be of some benefit.

Background and objective:X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia is the most common of the genetically determined forms of osteomalacia. The occurrence of hearing loss in X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia has been known since 1984. However, observations on the progression of such hearing loss, and suggestions regarding possible therapy, have not previously been published.Methods:Case report of a patient with X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia and hearing loss, with three years' audiological follow up, description of empirical therapy and literature review.Results:The patient presented with fluctuating hearing. An audiogram showed mild to severe sensorineural hearing loss mainly in the low and high frequencies. A temporary improvement of 20-40 dB after steroid therapy was observed. Four weeks later, hearing had deteriorated again, mainly in the low frequencies. After one year of fluctuating hearing levels, stabilisation occurred.Conclusions:In X-linked hypophosphataemic osteomalacia, hearing loss occurs predominantly in the low and high frequencies. The hearing loss type and progression pattern point to an endolymphatic hydrops as the pathogenetic mechanism. Steroid therapy may be of some benefit.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:January 2009
Deposited On:29 Oct 2008 12:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:29
Publisher:Cambridge University Press
ISSN:0022-2151
Additional Information:Copyright: Cambridge University Press
Publisher DOI:10.1017/S0022215107001636
PubMed ID:18279571
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4235

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