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Displaying centre of pressure location by electrotactile stimulation using phantom sensation


Pfeifer, S; Çaldıran, O; Vallery, H; Riener, R; Hernandez Arieta, A (2010). Displaying centre of pressure location by electrotactile stimulation using phantom sensation. In: 10th Vienna International Workshop on Functional Electrical Stimulation and 15th IFESS Annual Conference, Vienna, Austria, 8 September 2010 - 12 September 2010, 71-73.

Abstract

Amputees not only lack motor function, but also sensory feedback of the missing limb. It has been shown that lower limb amputees can improve certain gait characteristics when they perceive additional information about the kinematics and kinetics of their prosthetic leg. In this paper, we address the question whether it is feasible to provide centre of pressure location information via electrotactile displays by exploiting the phantom sensation phenomenon, where relative intensity of two electrode pairs is used to encode position between them, creating a single illusory stimulus. Four healthy subjects were asked to identify different locations or movement patterns of the illusory stimulus on a discrete scale under static and dynamic conditions. These stimuli resembled CoP patterns in different locomotor activities. An average recognition accuracy of 73% (std. dev. 17%) was achieved under static conditions, and of 71% (std. dev. 11%) under dynamic conditions. This indicates that the proposed display and mapping can be used to present centre of pressure location, and future work will focus on evaluation with patients.

Amputees not only lack motor function, but also sensory feedback of the missing limb. It has been shown that lower limb amputees can improve certain gait characteristics when they perceive additional information about the kinematics and kinetics of their prosthetic leg. In this paper, we address the question whether it is feasible to provide centre of pressure location information via electrotactile displays by exploiting the phantom sensation phenomenon, where relative intensity of two electrode pairs is used to encode position between them, creating a single illusory stimulus. Four healthy subjects were asked to identify different locations or movement patterns of the illusory stimulus on a discrete scale under static and dynamic conditions. These stimuli resembled CoP patterns in different locomotor activities. An average recognition accuracy of 73% (std. dev. 17%) was achieved under static conditions, and of 71% (std. dev. 11%) under dynamic conditions. This indicates that the proposed display and mapping can be used to present centre of pressure location, and future work will focus on evaluation with patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Other), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:12 September 2010
Deposited On:22 Feb 2011 14:21
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Other Identification Number:1578
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-42438

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