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On the influence of sensor morphology on vergence


Martinez, H; Sumioka, H; Lungarella, M; Pfeifer, R (2010). On the influence of sensor morphology on vergence. In: From animals to animats 11 proceedings 11th international conference on simulation of adaptive behavior, lecture notes in computer science, 2010, Paris, France, 25 August 2010 - 28 August 2010, 146-155.

Abstract

In the field of developmental robotics, a lot of attention has been devoted to algorithms that allow agents to build up skills through sensorimotor interaction. Such interaction is largely affected by the agent's morphology, that is, its shape, limb articulation, as well as the position and density of sensors on its body surface. Despite its importance, the impact of morphology on behavior has not been systematically addressed. In this paper, we take inspiration from the human vision system, and demonstrate using a binocular active vision platform why sensor morphology in combination with other properties of the body, are essential conditions to achieve coordinated visual behavior (here, vergence). Specifically, to evaluate the effect of sensor morphology on behavior, we present an information-theoretic analysis quantifying the statistical regularities induced through sensorimotor interaction. Our results show that only for an adequate sensor morphology, vergence increases the amount of information structure in the sensorimotor loop.

In the field of developmental robotics, a lot of attention has been devoted to algorithms that allow agents to build up skills through sensorimotor interaction. Such interaction is largely affected by the agent's morphology, that is, its shape, limb articulation, as well as the position and density of sensors on its body surface. Despite its importance, the impact of morphology on behavior has not been systematically addressed. In this paper, we take inspiration from the human vision system, and demonstrate using a binocular active vision platform why sensor morphology in combination with other properties of the body, are essential conditions to achieve coordinated visual behavior (here, vergence). Specifically, to evaluate the effect of sensor morphology on behavior, we present an information-theoretic analysis quantifying the statistical regularities induced through sensorimotor interaction. Our results show that only for an adequate sensor morphology, vergence increases the amount of information structure in the sensorimotor loop.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Event End Date:28 August 2010
Deposited On:13 Feb 2011 09:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:35
Publisher:Springer-Verlag
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-15193-4
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=NEBIS&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=SYS&request=006161491 (Organisation)
Other Identification Number:1594
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-42442

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