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Anselmetti, F S; Drescher-Schneider, R; Furrer, H; Graf, H R; Lowick, S E; Preusser, F; Riedi, M A (2010). A ~180,000 years sedimentation history of a perialpine overdeepened glacial trough (Wehntal, N-Switzerland). Swiss Journal of Geosciences, 103:345-361.

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Abstract

A 30 m-deep drill core from a glacially overdeepened trough in Northern Switzerland recovered a ~180 ka old sedimentary succession that provides new insights into the timing and nature of erosion–sedimentation processes in the Swiss lowlands. The luminescence-dated stratigraphic succession starts at the bottom of the core with laminated carbonate-rich lake sediments reflecting deposition in a proglacial lake between ~180 and 130 ka ago (Marine Isotope Stage MIS 6). Anomalies in geotechnical properties and the occurrence of deformation structures suggest temporary ice contact around 140 ka. Up-core, organic content increases in the lake deposits indicating a warming of climate. These sediments are overlain by a peat deposit characterised by pollen assemblages typical of the late Eemian (MIS 5e). An abrupt transition following this interglacial encompasses a likely hiatus and probably marks a sudden lowering of the water level. The peat unit is overlain by deposits of a cold unproductive lake dated to late MIS 5 and MIS 4, which do not show any direct influence from glaciers. An upper peat unit, the so-called «Mammoth peat», previously encountered in construction pits, interrupts this cold lacustrine phase and marks more temperate climatic conditions between 60 and 45 ka (MIS 3). In the upper part of the core, a succession of fluvial and alluvial deposits documents the Late Glacial and Holocene sedimentation in the basin. The sedimentary succession at Wehntal confirms that the glaciation during MIS 6 did not apparently cause the overdeepening of the valley, as the lacustrine basin fill covering most of MIS 6 is still preserved. Consequently, erosion of the basin is most likely linked to an older glaciation. This study shows that new dating techniques combined with palaeoenvironmental interpretations of sediments from such overdeepened troughs provide valuable insights into the past glacial history.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Paleontological Institute and Museum
DDC:560 Fossils & prehistoric life
Uncontrolled Keywords:Pleistocene � Glacial erosion � Proglacial sedimentation � Alps � Luminescence dating � Drillholes
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:17 Jan 2011 11:59
Last Modified:07 Jul 2014 09:14
Publisher:Birkhäuser
ISSN:1661-8726
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00015-010-0041-1
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 7
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 9

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