UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evolution towards self-compatibility when mates are limited


Willi, Y (2009). Evolution towards self-compatibility when mates are limited. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 22(9):1967-1973.

Abstract

Theory of plant mating system evolution predicts the spread of self-compatibility (SC) in a predominantly self-incompatible population when inbreeding depression (ID; the decline in fitness because of selfing) is small and when compatible mates are limited. I tested these two predictions by measuring the occurrence of SC in 13 natural populations of Ranunculus reptans L. that varied in ID and frequency of cross-incompatible mates. Enforced selfing experiments were conducted in 2 years. In the first year, self-pollination was applied at two flower ages to investigate the occurrence of delayed SC. I found that SC was not uncommon across all populations, but self-compatible plants usually produced few seeds. There was no evidence for delayed SC. The occurrence of SC was not associated with population-level ID, but populations with more limited availability of compatible mates had a significantly higher frequency of plants that were at least partially self-compatible. The results indicate that, in R. reptans, a shortage of available mates in small populations may cause the evolution of partial SC and mixed mating.

Theory of plant mating system evolution predicts the spread of self-compatibility (SC) in a predominantly self-incompatible population when inbreeding depression (ID; the decline in fitness because of selfing) is small and when compatible mates are limited. I tested these two predictions by measuring the occurrence of SC in 13 natural populations of Ranunculus reptans L. that varied in ID and frequency of cross-incompatible mates. Enforced selfing experiments were conducted in 2 years. In the first year, self-pollination was applied at two flower ages to investigate the occurrence of delayed SC. I found that SC was not uncommon across all populations, but self-compatible plants usually produced few seeds. There was no evidence for delayed SC. The occurrence of SC was not associated with population-level ID, but populations with more limited availability of compatible mates had a significantly higher frequency of plants that were at least partially self-compatible. The results indicate that, in R. reptans, a shortage of available mates in small populations may cause the evolution of partial SC and mixed mating.

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
15 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:inbreeding depression; inbreeding load; leaky self-incompatibility; mate limitation; mating system; polyploidy; Ranunculaceae; reproductive assurance; S-locus
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:08 Mar 2011 20:03
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:36
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1010-061X
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1420-9101.2009.01806.x
PubMed ID:19702891

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations