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Predicting the fix time of bugs


Giger, E; Pinzger, M; Gall, H C (2010). Predicting the fix time of bugs. In: 2nd International Workshop on Recommendation Systems for Software Engineering, Cape Town, South Africa, 4 May 2010 - 4 May 2010, 52-56.

Abstract

Two important questions concerning the coordination of development effort are which bugs to fix first and how long it takes to fix them. In this paper we investigate empirically the relationships between bug report attributes and the time to fix. The objective is to compute prediction models that can be used to recommend whether a new bug should and will be fixed fast or will take more time for resolution. We examine in detail if attributes of a bug report can be used to build such a recommender system. We use decision tree analysis to compute and 10-fold cross validation to test prediction models. We explore prediction models in a series of empirical studies with bug report data of six systems of the three open source projects Eclipse, Mozilla, and Gnome. Results show that our models perform significantly better than random classification. For example, fast fixed Eclipse Platform bugs were classified correctly with a precision of 0.654 and a recall of 0.692. We also show that the inclusion of postsubmission bug report data of up to one month can further improve prediction models.

Two important questions concerning the coordination of development effort are which bugs to fix first and how long it takes to fix them. In this paper we investigate empirically the relationships between bug report attributes and the time to fix. The objective is to compute prediction models that can be used to recommend whether a new bug should and will be fixed fast or will take more time for resolution. We examine in detail if attributes of a bug report can be used to build such a recommender system. We use decision tree analysis to compute and 10-fold cross validation to test prediction models. We explore prediction models in a series of empirical studies with bug report data of six systems of the three open source projects Eclipse, Mozilla, and Gnome. Results show that our models perform significantly better than random classification. For example, fast fixed Eclipse Platform bugs were classified correctly with a precision of 0.654 and a recall of 0.692. We also show that the inclusion of postsubmission bug report data of up to one month can further improve prediction models.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Informatics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
Language:English
Event End Date:4 May 2010
Deposited On:28 Feb 2011 08:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:36
Series Name:RSSE '10
Free access at:Related URL. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://www.ifi.uzh.ch/pax/index.php/publication/show/id/1572 (Author)
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-42662

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