UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Female dispersion and the evolution of monogamy in the dik-dik.


Brotherton, P M N; Manser, M B (1997). Female dispersion and the evolution of monogamy in the dik-dik. Animal Behaviour, 54(6):1413-1424.

Abstract

In facultatively monogamous mammals, females are thought to be too widely dispersed for males to defend more than one female range. We tested this hypothesis in a monogamous antelope, Kirk's dik-dik, Madoqua kirkii. Dik-dik territories were compared across three indices of quality to investigate whether males are monogamous because of constraints on the area, or resources, that they are capable of defending. Territories varied substantially in size and quality, with some containing up to five times the resources of others. Moreover, the territories of four temporarily polygynous males were not of higher quality than those of monogamous males. These results are inconsistent with the idea that dik-diks are facultatively monogamous: males can, and often do, defend enough resources and sufficient area to support two or more females. We investigated the relationship between resource dispersion and monogamy further by providing food to territories over a 3-month period. Although provisioned pairs obtained 20% of their daily requirements from the food, there was no change in the territory size of either sex. Female dispersion does not account for monogamy in the dik-dik; instead we argue that monogamy has evolved as a result of male mate guarding.

In facultatively monogamous mammals, females are thought to be too widely dispersed for males to defend more than one female range. We tested this hypothesis in a monogamous antelope, Kirk's dik-dik, Madoqua kirkii. Dik-dik territories were compared across three indices of quality to investigate whether males are monogamous because of constraints on the area, or resources, that they are capable of defending. Territories varied substantially in size and quality, with some containing up to five times the resources of others. Moreover, the territories of four temporarily polygynous males were not of higher quality than those of monogamous males. These results are inconsistent with the idea that dik-diks are facultatively monogamous: males can, and often do, defend enough resources and sufficient area to support two or more females. We investigated the relationship between resource dispersion and monogamy further by providing food to territories over a 3-month period. Although provisioned pairs obtained 20% of their daily requirements from the food, there was no change in the territory size of either sex. Female dispersion does not account for monogamy in the dik-dik; instead we argue that monogamy has evolved as a result of male mate guarding.

Citations

53 citations in Web of Science®
55 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:1997
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0003-3472
Publisher DOI:10.1006/anbe.1997.0551
PubMed ID:9794769

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations