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The G allele of transcobalamin 2 c.776C→G is associated with an unfavorable lipoprotein profile


Semmler, A; Farmand, S; Moskau, S; Stoffel-Wagner, B; Linnebank, M (2010). The G allele of transcobalamin 2 c.776C→G is associated with an unfavorable lipoprotein profile. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 57(2):112-115.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM: Recent studies have suggested a relation of homocysteine with lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible genetic basis for such a relation in 504 individuals including 135 consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with cerebrovascular disease as well as the patients' healthy spouses (n = 100) and offspring (n = 269).
METHODS: We analyzed the association of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides with plasma homocysteine levels and with the following 7 variants of homocysteine metabolism: dihydrofolate reductase c.594 + 59del19bp, cystathionine β-synthase c.844_855ins68, methionine synthase c.2756A→G, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.677C→T and c.1298A→C, reduced folate carrier 1 c.80G→A, and transcobalamin 2 (Tc2) c.776C→G.
RESULTS: Linear regression analysis showed an association of Tc2 c.776C→G with LDL (p = 0.010), HDL (p = 0.009), and TG (p = 0.007), with the G allele of Tc2 c.776C→G associated with an unfavorable blood lipid profile. Moreover, the G allele of Tc2 c.776C→G was associated with higher homocysteine plasma levels in the subgroup of patients (p = 0.013, 1-way ANOVA).
CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that alterations in homocysteine metabolism and an unfavorable blood lipoprotein profile may have a common genetic basis. Such conditions may be relevant for studies investigating independent risk factors for vascular disease.
Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/AIM: Recent studies have suggested a relation of homocysteine with lipid metabolism. The aim of this study was to analyze a possible genetic basis for such a relation in 504 individuals including 135 consecutive Caucasian patients diagnosed with cerebrovascular disease as well as the patients' healthy spouses (n = 100) and offspring (n = 269).
METHODS: We analyzed the association of plasma levels of lipoprotein(a), total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and triglycerides with plasma homocysteine levels and with the following 7 variants of homocysteine metabolism: dihydrofolate reductase c.594 + 59del19bp, cystathionine β-synthase c.844_855ins68, methionine synthase c.2756A→G, methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase c.677C→T and c.1298A→C, reduced folate carrier 1 c.80G→A, and transcobalamin 2 (Tc2) c.776C→G.
RESULTS: Linear regression analysis showed an association of Tc2 c.776C→G with LDL (p = 0.010), HDL (p = 0.009), and TG (p = 0.007), with the G allele of Tc2 c.776C→G associated with an unfavorable blood lipid profile. Moreover, the G allele of Tc2 c.776C→G was associated with higher homocysteine plasma levels in the subgroup of patients (p = 0.013, 1-way ANOVA).
CONCLUSION: These data support the hypothesis that alterations in homocysteine metabolism and an unfavorable blood lipoprotein profile may have a common genetic basis. Such conditions may be relevant for studies investigating independent risk factors for vascular disease.
Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

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2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:26 Jan 2011 18:58
Last Modified:01 Jul 2016 13:53
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0250-6807
Additional Information:© 2010 S. Karger AG
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000320418
PubMed ID:20948192

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