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Skin detachment and regrowth in toxic epidermal necrolysis


Feldmeyer, L; Harr, T; Cozzio, A; French, L E; Navarini, A A (2010). Skin detachment and regrowth in toxic epidermal necrolysis. Case Reports in Dermatology, 2(1):60-64.

Abstract

Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare but clinically well-described dermatological pathology. However, clinical pictures of this disorder in text books do not reflect its dynamic evolution. Usually, the desquamative post-bullous stage is represented, neglecting the initial bullous stage as well as the skin healing. With one clinical case, we provide a day-after-day illustration of the evolution of a patient suffering from toxic epidermal necrolysis. During one month, a skin area of a limb was regularly photo-documented.

Toxic epidermal necrolysis is a rare but clinically well-described dermatological pathology. However, clinical pictures of this disorder in text books do not reflect its dynamic evolution. Usually, the desquamative post-bullous stage is represented, neglecting the initial bullous stage as well as the skin healing. With one clinical case, we provide a day-after-day illustration of the evolution of a patient suffering from toxic epidermal necrolysis. During one month, a skin area of a limb was regularly photo-documented.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:27 Jan 2011 15:30
Last Modified:10 Jul 2016 07:27
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1662-6567
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1159/000313866
PubMed ID:21173930
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-43049

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