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Increasing temporal resolution of DSC perfusion MRI using the analytic image concept


Yankam Njiwa, J; Ratering, D; Baltes, C; Rudin, M (2010). Increasing temporal resolution of DSC perfusion MRI using the analytic image concept. Magma, 23(4):251-261.

Abstract

OBJECT: Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) is increasingly being used to evaluate cerebral microcirculation. In this study, the use of the analytic image reconstruction (AIR), with the aim to increase the temporal resolution, is evaluated for DSC-MRI in small animals.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Imaging was performed using a T (2)*- weighted sequence to acquire male Lewis rats raw data. Results show that AIR satisfactory reconstructs DSC-MRI while preserving a good reconstruction quality and the image characteristics compared to the full k-space and keyhole reconstructed images. The combination of the choice of the baseline image and the proposed asymmetric acquisition schema enables an increase in temporal resolution, by a factor of four, thus having more sample points for better estimating perfusion parameters.

RESULTS: Computer simulations result in a mean cerebral blood volume of 1.22 that deviates from the full k-space value by -3% and a mean cerebral blood flow of 1.97 deviating from the full k-space value by -3% when the mean transit time did not change. Even if these deviations increase when achieving real acquisitions, AIR still better computes quantitative values than keyhole.

CONCLUSION: AIR allows a good reconstruction of the dynamic stage of the image series thus leading to better dynamic effects analysis.

OBJECT: Dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) is increasingly being used to evaluate cerebral microcirculation. In this study, the use of the analytic image reconstruction (AIR), with the aim to increase the temporal resolution, is evaluated for DSC-MRI in small animals.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Imaging was performed using a T (2)*- weighted sequence to acquire male Lewis rats raw data. Results show that AIR satisfactory reconstructs DSC-MRI while preserving a good reconstruction quality and the image characteristics compared to the full k-space and keyhole reconstructed images. The combination of the choice of the baseline image and the proposed asymmetric acquisition schema enables an increase in temporal resolution, by a factor of four, thus having more sample points for better estimating perfusion parameters.

RESULTS: Computer simulations result in a mean cerebral blood volume of 1.22 that deviates from the full k-space value by -3% and a mean cerebral blood flow of 1.97 deviating from the full k-space value by -3% when the mean transit time did not change. Even if these deviations increase when achieving real acquisitions, AIR still better computes quantitative values than keyhole.

CONCLUSION: AIR allows a good reconstruction of the dynamic stage of the image series thus leading to better dynamic effects analysis.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:25 Jan 2011 13:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:38
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0968-5243
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10334-010-0224-9
PubMed ID:20694502

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