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Augmented stress-induced alcohol drinking and withdrawal in mice lacking functional natriuretic peptide-A receptors


Mutschler, J; Bilbao, A; von der Goltz, C; Demiralay, C; Jahn, H; Wiedemann, K; Spanagel, R; Kiefer, F (2010). Augmented stress-induced alcohol drinking and withdrawal in mice lacking functional natriuretic peptide-A receptors. Alcohol and Alcoholism, 45(1):13-16.

Abstract

AIMS: Preclinical and clinical data suggest an involvement of atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) in alcohol-associated psychopathology. We now present first data on alcohol drinking behaviour in mice lacking a functional natriuretic peptide-A (NPR-A) receptor.

METHODS: NPR-A(-/-) and wild-type mice were given a free choice between water and increasing concentrations of alcohol (2-16%). A forced swim stress was performed thereafter on three consecutive days to investigate stress-induced alcohol drinking. Additionally, neurobehavioural alcohol withdrawal response was investigated following 14 days of forced-alcohol intake.

RESULTS: Whereas basal alcohol intake did not differ between NPR-A mutants and wild-type littermates, NPR-A mutants showed an increased stress-induced alcohol intake and aggravated neurobehavioural symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

CONCLUSIONS: Mice lacking a functional NPR-A receptor represent a useful model to study the role of the ANP system in alcohol-associated pathology. To study the role of the natriuretic NPR-A gene for the modulation of risk of alcohol-related disorders, NPR-A-related polymorphisms should be targeted in clinical studies.

AIMS: Preclinical and clinical data suggest an involvement of atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) in alcohol-associated psychopathology. We now present first data on alcohol drinking behaviour in mice lacking a functional natriuretic peptide-A (NPR-A) receptor.

METHODS: NPR-A(-/-) and wild-type mice were given a free choice between water and increasing concentrations of alcohol (2-16%). A forced swim stress was performed thereafter on three consecutive days to investigate stress-induced alcohol drinking. Additionally, neurobehavioural alcohol withdrawal response was investigated following 14 days of forced-alcohol intake.

RESULTS: Whereas basal alcohol intake did not differ between NPR-A mutants and wild-type littermates, NPR-A mutants showed an increased stress-induced alcohol intake and aggravated neurobehavioural symptoms of alcohol withdrawal.

CONCLUSIONS: Mice lacking a functional NPR-A receptor represent a useful model to study the role of the ANP system in alcohol-associated pathology. To study the role of the natriuretic NPR-A gene for the modulation of risk of alcohol-related disorders, NPR-A-related polymorphisms should be targeted in clinical studies.

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11 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Clinical and Social Psychiatry Zurich West (former)
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:31 Jan 2011 14:23
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:40
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:0735-0414
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1093/alcalc/agp065
PubMed ID:19828462
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-43660

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