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Development and psychometric properties of a joint protection self-efficacy scale


Niedermann, K; Forster, A; Ciurea, A; Hammond, A; Uebelhart, D; de Bie, R (2011). Development and psychometric properties of a joint protection self-efficacy scale. Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, 18(2):143-152.

Abstract

Introduction: Self-efficacy is one of the most powerful determinants of behaviour change. To increase effectiveness of joint protection (JP) education, it may be important to address perceptions of JP self-efficacy directly. The aim of this study was to develop a scale to measure JP self-efficacy (JP-SES) in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Instrument development included item generation, construct validity, and reliability testing. Rasch analysis was applied to determine construct validity and the revised JP-SES was tested again to confirm validity and establish test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Results. A total of 46 items were generated by literature review, occupational therapists, and people with RA. After semi-structured interviews and field-testing with RA participants, a 26-item questionnaire draft was constructed and tested. Rasch analysis to determine construct validity reduced the JP-SES to 13 items with good overall fit values. Rasch analysis of confirmatory validity resulted in a final 10-item version of the JP-SES. Test-retest results supported the validity of the scale, with high internal consistency (alpha = 0.92) and good test-retest reliability (r(s) = 0.79; p < 0.001). Conclusions. The JP-SES is a valid and reliable scale to assess perceived ability of people with RA to apply JP methods. The JP-SES could help stimulate the use of efficacy-enhancing methods in JP education.

Introduction: Self-efficacy is one of the most powerful determinants of behaviour change. To increase effectiveness of joint protection (JP) education, it may be important to address perceptions of JP self-efficacy directly. The aim of this study was to develop a scale to measure JP self-efficacy (JP-SES) in people with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. Instrument development included item generation, construct validity, and reliability testing. Rasch analysis was applied to determine construct validity and the revised JP-SES was tested again to confirm validity and establish test-retest reliability and internal consistency. Results. A total of 46 items were generated by literature review, occupational therapists, and people with RA. After semi-structured interviews and field-testing with RA participants, a 26-item questionnaire draft was constructed and tested. Rasch analysis to determine construct validity reduced the JP-SES to 13 items with good overall fit values. Rasch analysis of confirmatory validity resulted in a final 10-item version of the JP-SES. Test-retest results supported the validity of the scale, with high internal consistency (alpha = 0.92) and good test-retest reliability (r(s) = 0.79; p < 0.001). Conclusions. The JP-SES is a valid and reliable scale to assess perceived ability of people with RA to apply JP methods. The JP-SES could help stimulate the use of efficacy-enhancing methods in JP education.

Citations

2 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:02 Feb 2011 17:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:40
Publisher:Informa Healthcare
ISSN:1103-8128
Publisher DOI:10.3109/11038128.2010.483690
PubMed ID:20450381

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