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Milk intake and risk of hip fracture in men and women: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies


Bischoff-Ferrari, H A; Dawson-Hughes, B; Baron, J A; Kanis, J A; Orav, E J; Staehelin, H B; Kiel, D P; Burckhardt, P; Henschkowski, J; Spiegelman, D; Li, R; Wong, J B; Feskanich, D; Willett, W C (2011). Milk intake and risk of hip fracture in men and women: A meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, 26(4):833-839.

Abstract

CONTEXT: Milk contains calcium, phosphorus, and protein, and is fortified with vitamin D in the US. All of these ingredients may improve bone health. However, the potential benefit of milk on hip fracture prevention is not well established. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of milk intake with risk of hip fracture based on a meta-analysis of cohort studies in middle aged or older men and women. DATA SOURCES: English and non-English publications searching Medline (Ovid, Pubmed) and EMBASE up to June 2010; experts in the field; reference lists. STUDY SELECTION: Prospective cohort studies. To compare studies on the same scale, we calculated the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture per glass of milk intake daily (approximately 300 mg calcium per glass of milk). Pooled analyses were based on random effects models. DATA EXTRACTION: By two independent observers. RESULTS: In women (6 studies, 195,102 women, 3574 hip fractures), there was no overall association between total milk intake and hip fracture risk (pooled RR per glass of milk per day = 0.99; 95% CI 0.96 - 1.02; Q-test p-value = 0.37). In men, (3 studies, 75149 men, 195 hip fractures), the pooled RR per daily glass of milk was 0.91 (95% CI 0.81 - 1.01). CONCLUSION: In the meta-analysis of cohort studies, there was no overall association between milk intake and hip fracture in women but more data are needed in men.

CONTEXT: Milk contains calcium, phosphorus, and protein, and is fortified with vitamin D in the US. All of these ingredients may improve bone health. However, the potential benefit of milk on hip fracture prevention is not well established. OBJECTIVE: To assess the association of milk intake with risk of hip fracture based on a meta-analysis of cohort studies in middle aged or older men and women. DATA SOURCES: English and non-English publications searching Medline (Ovid, Pubmed) and EMBASE up to June 2010; experts in the field; reference lists. STUDY SELECTION: Prospective cohort studies. To compare studies on the same scale, we calculated the relative risk (RR) of hip fracture per glass of milk intake daily (approximately 300 mg calcium per glass of milk). Pooled analyses were based on random effects models. DATA EXTRACTION: By two independent observers. RESULTS: In women (6 studies, 195,102 women, 3574 hip fractures), there was no overall association between total milk intake and hip fracture risk (pooled RR per glass of milk per day = 0.99; 95% CI 0.96 - 1.02; Q-test p-value = 0.37). In men, (3 studies, 75149 men, 195 hip fractures), the pooled RR per daily glass of milk was 0.91 (95% CI 0.81 - 1.01). CONCLUSION: In the meta-analysis of cohort studies, there was no overall association between milk intake and hip fracture in women but more data are needed in men.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Geriatric Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:360 Social problems & social services
610 Medicine & health
300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:01 Feb 2011 11:41
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:40
Publisher:American Society for Bone and Mineral Research
ISSN:0884-0431
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1002/jbmr.279
PubMed ID:20949604

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