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Studying human circadian behaviour using peripheral cells


Pagani, L; Eckert, A; Brown, S A (2011). Studying human circadian behaviour using peripheral cells. In: Clelland, J D. Genomics, Proteomics, and the Nervous System. New York: Springer, 279-302.

Abstract

Complex behaviours are the product of intercellular signalling events, but their intracellular effectors are present in most cell types. The best-studied example of such architecture is the circadian clock, which directs all diurnal behaviour and physiology, and whose central mechanism is present in most body cells. We present below a method to look at its properties via transcriptional reporters virally delivered to primary cells. By studying primary fibroblasts cultivated from skin biopsies in different human subjects, we have been able to analyse the molecular underpinnings of variance in human daily behaviour. Similar methodologies could be applied to other signalling pathways.

Complex behaviours are the product of intercellular signalling events, but their intracellular effectors are present in most cell types. The best-studied example of such architecture is the circadian clock, which directs all diurnal behaviour and physiology, and whose central mechanism is present in most body cells. We present below a method to look at its properties via transcriptional reporters virally delivered to primary cells. By studying primary fibroblasts cultivated from skin biopsies in different human subjects, we have been able to analyse the molecular underpinnings of variance in human daily behaviour. Similar methodologies could be applied to other signalling pathways.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:03 Feb 2011 18:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:41
Publisher:Springer
Series Name:Advances in Neurobiology
Number:2
ISSN:2190-5215
ISBN:978-1-441-97196-8 (hbk.) ; 978-1-441-97197-5 (ebook)
Publisher DOI:10.1007/978-1-4419-7197-5_11
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-44014

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