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A high-density random-oligonucleotide genome microarray for universal diagnostics


Frey, J E; Pasquer, F; Pelludat, C; Duffy, B (2010). A high-density random-oligonucleotide genome microarray for universal diagnostics. EPPO Bulletin, 40(1):40-45.

Abstract

Microarrays offer virtually unlimited diagnostics capability, and have already been developed into diagnostic chips for many different plant pests. The full capacity of such chips, however, has lagged far behind their full potential. The main reason for this is that current chip design relies on a priori genetic information for target organisms and on a consensus on the genetic sequences to be used in particular organism groups. Such information is often unavailable and laborious to obtain. Thus, broad-application diagnostic microarrays have been limited to narrow organism groups focused on Genera of pests/pathogens or those affecting individual host crops, without applicability for simultaneous detection of diverse pests affecting many crops. This paper describes the development of a diagnostic microarray platform that has universal application based on genomic fingerprinting of any organism without a need for a priori sequence information. Taxon-specific hybridization patterns are obtained by unique hybridisation of genomic DNA to 100s–1000s of short random oligonucleotide probes. Taxon identification is then achieved by comparison of hybridisation patterns from an unknown sample against a reference-pattern database. Using bacteria as a model pathogen group, these methods deliver highly reproducible hybridisation patterns with high resolution power and enable discrimination at the species and subspecies level.

Microarrays offer virtually unlimited diagnostics capability, and have already been developed into diagnostic chips for many different plant pests. The full capacity of such chips, however, has lagged far behind their full potential. The main reason for this is that current chip design relies on a priori genetic information for target organisms and on a consensus on the genetic sequences to be used in particular organism groups. Such information is often unavailable and laborious to obtain. Thus, broad-application diagnostic microarrays have been limited to narrow organism groups focused on Genera of pests/pathogens or those affecting individual host crops, without applicability for simultaneous detection of diverse pests affecting many crops. This paper describes the development of a diagnostic microarray platform that has universal application based on genomic fingerprinting of any organism without a need for a priori sequence information. Taxon-specific hybridization patterns are obtained by unique hybridisation of genomic DNA to 100s–1000s of short random oligonucleotide probes. Taxon identification is then achieved by comparison of hybridisation patterns from an unknown sample against a reference-pattern database. Using bacteria as a model pathogen group, these methods deliver highly reproducible hybridisation patterns with high resolution power and enable discrimination at the species and subspecies level.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Plant and Microbial Biology
07 Faculty of Science > Zurich-Basel Plant Science Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:580 Plants (Botany)
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:17 Feb 2011 18:50
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:41
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0250-8052
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2338.2009.02352.x
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-44030

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