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Transcriptome analysis revealed unique genes as targets for the anti-inflammatory action of activated protein C in human macrophages


Pereira, C P; Bachli, E B; Schaer, D J; Schoedon, G (2010). Transcriptome analysis revealed unique genes as targets for the anti-inflammatory action of activated protein C in human macrophages. PLoS ONE, 5(10):e15352.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Activated protein C (APC) has been introduced as a therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with severe sepsis due to its unique anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties in the vascular system. In this study we investigated novel targets for the anti-inflammatory action of APC in human macrophages.
METHODS: Using a genome-wide approach, effects of APC on the expression profile in inflammatory activated human macrophages were analyzed.
RESULTS: We identified, for the first time, genes that are specifically regulated by APC under inflammatory conditions, such as chromatin binding protein 4B (CHMP4B) and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), thus indicating a role of APC in the epigenetic control of gene transcription. A functional assay showed the influence of APC in the acetyltransferase/deacetylase activity of nuclear extracts from inflamed macrophages.
CONCLUSION: Our data sheds new light on APC targets in inflammation and opens new lines of investigation that may be explored in order to further elucidate its unique molecule properties.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Activated protein C (APC) has been introduced as a therapeutic agent for treatment of patients with severe sepsis due to its unique anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory properties in the vascular system. In this study we investigated novel targets for the anti-inflammatory action of APC in human macrophages.
METHODS: Using a genome-wide approach, effects of APC on the expression profile in inflammatory activated human macrophages were analyzed.
RESULTS: We identified, for the first time, genes that are specifically regulated by APC under inflammatory conditions, such as chromatin binding protein 4B (CHMP4B) and p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), thus indicating a role of APC in the epigenetic control of gene transcription. A functional assay showed the influence of APC in the acetyltransferase/deacetylase activity of nuclear extracts from inflamed macrophages.
CONCLUSION: Our data sheds new light on APC targets in inflammation and opens new lines of investigation that may be explored in order to further elucidate its unique molecule properties.

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2 citations in Web of Science®
3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:01 Feb 2011 15:58
Last Modified:05 Jul 2016 11:49
Publisher:Public Library of Science (PLoS)
ISSN:1932-6203
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0015352
PubMed ID:20976180

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