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Permanent URL to this publication: http://dx.doi.org/10.5167/uzh-44303

Gannage, M; Münz, C (2010). MHC presentation via autophagy and how viruses escape from it. Seminars in Immunopathology, 32(4):373-381.

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Abstract

T cells detect infected and transformed cells via antigen presentation by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules on the cell surface. For T cell stimulation, these MHC molecules present fragments of proteins that are expressed or taken up by the cell. These fragments are generated by distinct proteolytic mechanisms for presentation on MHC class I molecules to cytotoxic CD8(+) and on MHC class II molecules to helper CD4(+) T cells. Proteasomes are primarily involved in MHC class I ligand and lysosomes, in MHC class II ligand generation. Autophagy delivers cytoplasmic material to lysosomes and, therefore, contributes to cytoplasmic antigen presentation by MHC class II molecules. In addition, it has been recently realized that this process also supports extracellular antigen processing for MHC class II presentation and cross-presentation on MHC class I molecules. Although the exact mechanisms for the regulation of these antigen processing pathways by autophagy are still unknown, recent studies, summarized in this review, suggest that they contribute to immune responses against infections and to maintain tolerance. Moreover, they are targeted by viruses for immune escape and could maybe be harnessed for immunotherapy.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Experimental Immunology
DDC:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:11 Feb 2011 12:18
Last Modified:02 Dec 2013 13:19
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1863-2297
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00281-010-0227-7
PubMed ID:20857294
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 7
Google Scholar™
Scopus®. Citation Count: 10

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