UZH-Logo

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Switzerland: a nationwide surveillance 1997-2003


Schifferli, A; von Vigier, R O; Fontana, M; Spartà, G; Schmid, H; Bianchetti, M G; Rudin, C (2010). Hemolytic-uremic syndrome in Switzerland: a nationwide surveillance 1997-2003. European Journal of Pediatrics, 169(5):591-598.

Abstract

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in childhood. In its typical presentation, it is preceded by an episode of diarrhea mostly due to Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli. There is important geographical variation of many aspects of this syndrome. Nationwide data on childhood HUS in Switzerland have not been available so far. In a prospective national study through the Swiss Pediatric Surveillance Unit 114 cases (median age 21 months, 50% boys) were reported between April 1997 and March 2003 by 38 pediatric units (annual incidence 1.42 per 10(5) children < or =16 years). Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli were isolated in 32 (60%) of tested stool samples, serotype O157:H7 in eight. Sixteen children presented with only minimal renal involvement, including three with underlying urinary tract infection. Six patients presented with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and six with HUS due to invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Mortality was 5.3%, including two out of six children with S. pneumoniae infection. The severity of thrombocytopenia and the presence of central nervous system involvement significantly correlated with mortality. In conclusion, childhood HUS is not rare in Switzerland. Contrasting other countries, E. coli O157:H7 play only a minor role in the etiology. Incomplete manifestation is not uncommon.

Hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) is a leading cause of acute renal failure in childhood. In its typical presentation, it is preceded by an episode of diarrhea mostly due to Shiga-toxin-producing Escherichia coli. There is important geographical variation of many aspects of this syndrome. Nationwide data on childhood HUS in Switzerland have not been available so far. In a prospective national study through the Swiss Pediatric Surveillance Unit 114 cases (median age 21 months, 50% boys) were reported between April 1997 and March 2003 by 38 pediatric units (annual incidence 1.42 per 10(5) children < or =16 years). Shiga-toxin-producing E. coli were isolated in 32 (60%) of tested stool samples, serotype O157:H7 in eight. Sixteen children presented with only minimal renal involvement, including three with underlying urinary tract infection. Six patients presented with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome, and six with HUS due to invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae infection. Mortality was 5.3%, including two out of six children with S. pneumoniae infection. The severity of thrombocytopenia and the presence of central nervous system involvement significantly correlated with mortality. In conclusion, childhood HUS is not rare in Switzerland. Contrasting other countries, E. coli O157:H7 play only a minor role in the etiology. Incomplete manifestation is not uncommon.

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 03 Feb 2011
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:03 Feb 2011 16:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:42
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0340-6199
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00431-009-1079-9
PubMed ID:19830454
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-44526

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations