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MR defecography in patients with dyssynergic defecation: spectrum of imaging findings and diagnostic value


Reiner, C S; Tutuian, R; Solopova, A E; Pohl, D; Marincek, B; Weishaupt, D (2011). MR defecography in patients with dyssynergic defecation: spectrum of imaging findings and diagnostic value. British Journal of Radiology, 84(998):136-144.

Abstract

Objectives: We describe the spectrum of findings and the diagnostic value of MR defecography in patients referred with suspicion of dyssynergic defecation. Methods: 48 patients (34 females, 14 males; mean age 48 years) with constipation and clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation underwent MR defecography. Patients were divided into patients with dyssynergic defecation (n = 18) and constipated patients without dyssynergic defecation (control group, n = 30). MRIs were analysed for evacuation ability, time to initiate evacuation, time of evacuation, changes in the anorectal angle (ARA-change), presence of paradoxical sphincter contraction and presence of additional pelvic floor abnormalities. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation were calculated. Results: The most frequent finding was impaired evacuation, which was seen in 100% of patients with dyssynergic defecation and in 83% of the control group, yielding a sensitivity for MR defecography for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 97-100%), but a specificity of only 23% (95% CI 7-40%). A lower sensitivity (50%; 95% CI 24-76%) and a high specificity (97%; 95% CI 89-100%) were seen with abnormal ARA-change. The sensitivity of paradoxical sphincter contraction was relatively high (83%; 95% CI 63-100%). A combined analysis of abnormal ARA-change and paradoxical sphincter contraction allowed for the detection of 94% (95% CI 81-100%) of the patients with dyssynergic defecation. Conclusion: MR defecography detects functional and structural abnormal findings in patients with clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation. Impaired evacuation is seen in patients with functional constipation owing to other pelvic floor abnormalities than dyssynergic defecation.

Objectives: We describe the spectrum of findings and the diagnostic value of MR defecography in patients referred with suspicion of dyssynergic defecation. Methods: 48 patients (34 females, 14 males; mean age 48 years) with constipation and clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation underwent MR defecography. Patients were divided into patients with dyssynergic defecation (n = 18) and constipated patients without dyssynergic defecation (control group, n = 30). MRIs were analysed for evacuation ability, time to initiate evacuation, time of evacuation, changes in the anorectal angle (ARA-change), presence of paradoxical sphincter contraction and presence of additional pelvic floor abnormalities. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and accuracy for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation were calculated. Results: The most frequent finding was impaired evacuation, which was seen in 100% of patients with dyssynergic defecation and in 83% of the control group, yielding a sensitivity for MR defecography for the diagnosis of dyssynergic defecation of 100% (95% confidence interval (CI) 97-100%), but a specificity of only 23% (95% CI 7-40%). A lower sensitivity (50%; 95% CI 24-76%) and a high specificity (97%; 95% CI 89-100%) were seen with abnormal ARA-change. The sensitivity of paradoxical sphincter contraction was relatively high (83%; 95% CI 63-100%). A combined analysis of abnormal ARA-change and paradoxical sphincter contraction allowed for the detection of 94% (95% CI 81-100%) of the patients with dyssynergic defecation. Conclusion: MR defecography detects functional and structural abnormal findings in patients with clinically suspected dyssynergic defecation. Impaired evacuation is seen in patients with functional constipation owing to other pelvic floor abnormalities than dyssynergic defecation.

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12 citations in Web of Science®
23 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:08 Feb 2011 15:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:44
Publisher:British Institute of Radiology
ISSN:0007-1285
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1259/bjr/28989463
PubMed ID:21257836

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