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Khan, N; Dodd, R; Marks, M P; Bell-Stephens, T; Vavao, J; Steinberg, G K (2011). Failure of primary percutaneous angioplasty and stenting in the prevention of ischemia in moyamoya angiopathy. Cerebrovascular Diseases, 31(2):147-53.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Moyamoya disease (MMD) is an idiopathic progressive arteriopathy affecting the proximal intracranial vasculature. To date only 4 case reports on intracranial angioplasty or stenting as treatment of this disease exist. We present 5 adult patients with MMD who failed angioplasty and/or stenting who remained symptomatic despite endovascular treatment or presented with recurrent symptoms and recurrence of stenosis/occlusion on angiography requiring subsequent extracranial-intracranial revascularization.

METHODS: Five adult MMD patients who underwent endovascular treatment with angioplasty or stenting were referred for further evaluation and treatment from outside hospitals. Data were collected from clinical referral notes and angiograms or reports. All patients underwent repeat 6-vessel cerebral angiography to assess the extent of disease and results of prior endovascular treatment.

RESULTS: Six endovascular procedures were performed in all 5 patients. Internal carotid artery (ICA) balloon angioplasty and Wingspan stenting was performed in 2 patients (3 arteries). One patient had ICA-M1 angioplasty without stenting. Two patients had M1 angioplasty and Wingspan stenting. All patients developed repeat transient ischemic attacks following treatment attributable to the vascular territories of endovascular treatment. Repeat endovascular treatment was performed in 3 patients at a mean of 4 months (range = 2-6). Two went on to a third endovascular treatment due to progression of disease in the angioplastied/stented vessel. The average time of symptom recurrence after initial endovascular therapy was 1.8 months (0-4 months). Follow-up angiography when referred to our institution demonstrated 70-90% instent restenosis of the stented vessel in 3 and occlusion in 1 patient. Due to persistence of symptoms cerebral revascularization was performed in all patients.

CONCLUSION: MMD is a progressive angiopathy. Angioplasty and stenting may temporarily improve the cerebral blood flow and decrease cerebral ischemic events but do not appear to be durable nor provide long-term prevention against future ischemic events.

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Surgery
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:10 Feb 2011 12:36
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 22:44
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1015-9770
Additional Information:© 2010 S. Karger AG
Publisher DOI:10.1159/000320253
PubMed ID:21135550
Citations:Web of Science®. Times Cited: 7
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