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Optimization of on-resonant magnetization transfer contrast in coronary vein MRI


Stoeck, C T; Hu, P; Peters, D C; Kissinger, K V; Goddu, B; Goepfert, L; Ngo, L; Manning, W J; Kozerke, S; Nezafat, R (2010). Optimization of on-resonant magnetization transfer contrast in coronary vein MRI. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 64(6):1849-54.

Abstract

Magnetization transfer contrast has been used commonly for endogenous tissue contrast improvements in angiography, brain, body, and cardiac imaging. Both off-resonant and on-resonant RF pulses can be used to generate magnetization transfer based contrast. In this study, on-resonant magnetization transfer preparation using binomial pulses were optimized and compared with off-resonant magnetization transfer for imaging of coronary veins. Three parameters were studied with simulations and in vivo measurements: flip angle, pulse repetitions, and binomial pulse order. Subsequently, first or second order binomial on-resonant magnetization transfer pulses with eight repetitions of 720° and 240° flip angle were used for coronary vein MRI. Flip angles of 720° yielded contrast enhancement of 115% (P < 0.0006) for first order on-resonant and 95% (P < 0.0006) for off-resonant magnetization transfer. There was no statistically significance difference between off-resonant and on-resonant first order binomial Magnetization transfer at 720°. However, for off-resonance pulses, much more preparation time is needed when compared with the binomials but with considerably reduced specific absorption rate.

Magnetization transfer contrast has been used commonly for endogenous tissue contrast improvements in angiography, brain, body, and cardiac imaging. Both off-resonant and on-resonant RF pulses can be used to generate magnetization transfer based contrast. In this study, on-resonant magnetization transfer preparation using binomial pulses were optimized and compared with off-resonant magnetization transfer for imaging of coronary veins. Three parameters were studied with simulations and in vivo measurements: flip angle, pulse repetitions, and binomial pulse order. Subsequently, first or second order binomial on-resonant magnetization transfer pulses with eight repetitions of 720° and 240° flip angle were used for coronary vein MRI. Flip angles of 720° yielded contrast enhancement of 115% (P < 0.0006) for first order on-resonant and 95% (P < 0.0006) for off-resonant magnetization transfer. There was no statistically significance difference between off-resonant and on-resonant first order binomial Magnetization transfer at 720°. However, for off-resonance pulses, much more preparation time is needed when compared with the binomials but with considerably reduced specific absorption rate.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:14 Feb 2011 09:46
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:45
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0740-3194
Publisher DOI:10.1002/mrm.22581
PubMed ID:20938974
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-45295

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