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Prospective European multicenter randomized trial of PleuraSeal for control of air leaks after elective pulmonary resection


De Leyn, P; Muller, M R; Oosterhuis, J W A; Schmid, T; Choong, C C; Weder, W; Sokolow, Y (2011). Prospective European multicenter randomized trial of PleuraSeal for control of air leaks after elective pulmonary resection. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 141(4):881-887.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a synthetic bioresorbable pleural sealant (PleuraSeal; Covidien, Bedford, Mass) to treat air leaks after pulmonary resection. METHODS: Patients with air leaks after lung resection were randomized to treatment with pleural sealant on air leak sites after standard methods of lung closure or standard lung closure only. The primary outcome variable was the percentage of patients remaining air leak free until discharge. The secondary outcome variables were the proportion of patients with successful intraoperative air leak sealing, time to last air leak, and durations of chest tube drainage and hospitalization. RESULTS: The sealant group comprised 62 subjects, and the control group comprised 59 subjects. Most patients (98.3%) underwent open lobectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma. The overall success rates for intraoperative air leak sealing were as follows: sealant group, 71.0%; control group, 23.7% (P < .001). For grade 2 and 3 air leaks (n = 77), the intraoperative sealing rates were as follows: sealant group, 71.7%; control group, 9.1% (P < .001). More patients with grade 2 and 3 air leaks had their leaks remain sealed in the sealant group (43.5% vs 15.2%, P = .013). The median time from skin closure to last observable air leak was 6 hours (sealant group) versus 42 hours (control group, P = .718). No treatment-related complications were reported. No differences in drainage or hospitalization were observed. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study the pleural sealant was safe and effective treatment for intraoperative air leaks after lung resection. Significantly fewer patients with surgically relevant intraoperative air leaks had postoperative air leaks when the pleural sealant was applied.

OBJECTIVES: We sought to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a synthetic bioresorbable pleural sealant (PleuraSeal; Covidien, Bedford, Mass) to treat air leaks after pulmonary resection. METHODS: Patients with air leaks after lung resection were randomized to treatment with pleural sealant on air leak sites after standard methods of lung closure or standard lung closure only. The primary outcome variable was the percentage of patients remaining air leak free until discharge. The secondary outcome variables were the proportion of patients with successful intraoperative air leak sealing, time to last air leak, and durations of chest tube drainage and hospitalization. RESULTS: The sealant group comprised 62 subjects, and the control group comprised 59 subjects. Most patients (98.3%) underwent open lobectomy for bronchogenic carcinoma. The overall success rates for intraoperative air leak sealing were as follows: sealant group, 71.0%; control group, 23.7% (P < .001). For grade 2 and 3 air leaks (n = 77), the intraoperative sealing rates were as follows: sealant group, 71.7%; control group, 9.1% (P < .001). More patients with grade 2 and 3 air leaks had their leaks remain sealed in the sealant group (43.5% vs 15.2%, P = .013). The median time from skin closure to last observable air leak was 6 hours (sealant group) versus 42 hours (control group, P = .718). No treatment-related complications were reported. No differences in drainage or hospitalization were observed. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicenter study the pleural sealant was safe and effective treatment for intraoperative air leaks after lung resection. Significantly fewer patients with surgically relevant intraoperative air leaks had postoperative air leaks when the pleural sealant was applied.

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13 citations in Web of Science®
13 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Thoracic Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:18 Feb 2011 08:17
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:46
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-5223
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtcvs.2010.09.019
PubMed ID:21093877

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