UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Pre-reproductive alliance formation in female wild house mice (Mus domesticus): the effects of familiarity and age disparity.


Rusu, A S; König, B; Krackow, S (2004). Pre-reproductive alliance formation in female wild house mice (Mus domesticus): the effects of familiarity and age disparity. Acta Ethologica, 6(2):53-58.

Abstract

Female house mice (Mus domesticus) are known to perform communal breeding more often with
kin than with non-kin partners. When mice are grouped in semi-natural enclosures, related females develop prereproductive alliances more frequently than unrelated ones. However, little is known about the behavioural
mechanisms and the factors promoting kin preferential cooperative associations in female mice. Here we evaluate the relative importance of familiarity and age disparity on the pre-reproductive development of agonistic behaviour and spatial associations within groups of three related females, freely interacting in semi-natural indoor enclosures. We found that familiarity clearly promoted female alliance formation by reducing aggression and enhancing spatial cohabitation, while genetic relatedness per se did not alleviate the effects of unfamiliarity on female grouping. Older sisters clearly dominated younger ones, even if they had lower body weights, or if they had to confront two allied littermate sisters. Hence, our findings corroborate previous findings on familiarity as a proxy for kin-preferential alliance formation in female mice. Moreover, we observed a strong impact of age stratification on female aggression-mediated dominance development. We
suggest that this age effect could be expected from a queuing-for-reproduction view of younger house mouse females.

Female house mice (Mus domesticus) are known to perform communal breeding more often with
kin than with non-kin partners. When mice are grouped in semi-natural enclosures, related females develop prereproductive alliances more frequently than unrelated ones. However, little is known about the behavioural
mechanisms and the factors promoting kin preferential cooperative associations in female mice. Here we evaluate the relative importance of familiarity and age disparity on the pre-reproductive development of agonistic behaviour and spatial associations within groups of three related females, freely interacting in semi-natural indoor enclosures. We found that familiarity clearly promoted female alliance formation by reducing aggression and enhancing spatial cohabitation, while genetic relatedness per se did not alleviate the effects of unfamiliarity on female grouping. Older sisters clearly dominated younger ones, even if they had lower body weights, or if they had to confront two allied littermate sisters. Hence, our findings corroborate previous findings on familiarity as a proxy for kin-preferential alliance formation in female mice. Moreover, we observed a strong impact of age stratification on female aggression-mediated dominance development. We
suggest that this age effect could be expected from a queuing-for-reproduction view of younger house mouse females.

Citations

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:11 Feb 2008 12:15
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:14
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0873-9749
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s10211-004-0084-2

Download

Full text not available from this repository.View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations