UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Judgement of hygienic quality of roughage in horse stables in Switzerland.


Wichert, B; Nater, S; Wittenbrink, M M; Wolf, P; Meyer, K; Wanner, M (2008). Judgement of hygienic quality of roughage in horse stables in Switzerland. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition, 92(4):432-437.

Abstract

In 46 horse farms all over Switzerland, the hygienic quality of the roughage (including silages) was investigated. Therefore, a macroscopic examination as well as the microbial counts (bacteria, yeasts and moulds) was carried out. Further, the contents of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and the contamination with deoxynivalenol (DON) were determined. In all roughages, the dry matter (DM) content was measured and in silages additionally the pH was measured. Predominantly, the straw showed a lower hygienic quality than hay and silages. The LPS contents were significantly higher in straw than those in hay samples. The macroscopic examination and the microbial counts showed a tendency in the same direction. Eight straw samples and one hay sample with DON contamination were found. The silages showed a DM content with a median of 65.8%. The pH of those silages was between 4.3 and 5.9. Despite the high values of DM and pH, the silages showed mainly a high hygienic quality. In total, the hygienic standard of straw was worse than that of hay. This should be taken into account also in straw used as bedding as much as the hygienic quality of hay.

In 46 horse farms all over Switzerland, the hygienic quality of the roughage (including silages) was investigated. Therefore, a macroscopic examination as well as the microbial counts (bacteria, yeasts and moulds) was carried out. Further, the contents of lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and the contamination with deoxynivalenol (DON) were determined. In all roughages, the dry matter (DM) content was measured and in silages additionally the pH was measured. Predominantly, the straw showed a lower hygienic quality than hay and silages. The LPS contents were significantly higher in straw than those in hay samples. The macroscopic examination and the microbial counts showed a tendency in the same direction. Eight straw samples and one hay sample with DON contamination were found. The silages showed a DM content with a median of 65.8%. The pH of those silages was between 4.3 and 5.9. Despite the high values of DM and pH, the silages showed mainly a high hygienic quality. In total, the hygienic standard of straw was worse than that of hay. This should be taken into account also in straw used as bedding as much as the hygienic quality of hay.

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

96 downloads since deposited on 18 Nov 2008
19 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Bacteriology
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Animal Nutrition
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:roughage, hygenic quality, LPS, macroscopic examination, DON
Language:English
Date:31 January 2008
Deposited On:18 Nov 2008 07:18
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:31
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0931-2439
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0396.2007.00755.x
Official URL:http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/fulltext/120174289/PDFSTART
PubMed ID:18662352
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4595

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations