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ACCURATUM: improved calcium volume scoring using a mesh-based algorithm-a phantom study


Saur, S C; Alkadhi, H; Desbiolles, L; Székely, G; Cattin, P C (2009). ACCURATUM: improved calcium volume scoring using a mesh-based algorithm-a phantom study. European Radiology, 19(3):591-598.

Abstract

To overcome the limitations of the classical volume scoring method for quantifying coronary calcifications, including accuracy, variability between examinations, and dependency on plaque density and acquisition parameters, a mesh-based volume measurement method has been developed. It was evaluated and compared with the classical volume scoring method for accuracy, i.e., the normalized volume (measured volume/ground-truthed volume), and for variability between examinations (standard deviation of accuracy). A cardiac computed-tomography (CT) phantom containing various cylindrical calcifications was scanned using different tube voltages and reconstruction kernels, at various positions and orientations on the CT table and using different slice thicknesses. Mean accuracy for all plaques was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for the proposed method (1.220 +/- 0.507) than for the classical volume score (1.896 +/- 1.095). In contrast to the classical volume score, plaque density (p = 0.84), reconstruction kernel (p = 0.19), and tube voltage (p = 0.27) had no impact on the accuracy of the developed method. In conclusion, the method presented herein is more accurate than classical calcium scoring and is less dependent on tube voltage, reconstruction kernel, and plaque density.

To overcome the limitations of the classical volume scoring method for quantifying coronary calcifications, including accuracy, variability between examinations, and dependency on plaque density and acquisition parameters, a mesh-based volume measurement method has been developed. It was evaluated and compared with the classical volume scoring method for accuracy, i.e., the normalized volume (measured volume/ground-truthed volume), and for variability between examinations (standard deviation of accuracy). A cardiac computed-tomography (CT) phantom containing various cylindrical calcifications was scanned using different tube voltages and reconstruction kernels, at various positions and orientations on the CT table and using different slice thicknesses. Mean accuracy for all plaques was significantly higher (p < 0.0001) for the proposed method (1.220 +/- 0.507) than for the classical volume score (1.896 +/- 1.095). In contrast to the classical volume score, plaque density (p = 0.84), reconstruction kernel (p = 0.19), and tube voltage (p = 0.27) had no impact on the accuracy of the developed method. In conclusion, the method presented herein is more accurate than classical calcium scoring and is less dependent on tube voltage, reconstruction kernel, and plaque density.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:March 2009
Deposited On:03 Nov 2008 16:42
Last Modified:13 Sep 2016 07:28
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0938-7994
Additional Information:The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com
Publisher DOI:10.1007/s00330-008-1181-9
Official URL:http://www.springerlink.com/content/55560438821838r3/
PubMed ID:18818930
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4618

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