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Bagherzadegan, N; Hohlweg-Majert, B; Mücke, T; Haerle, S; Deppe, H; Wolff, K D; Hölzle, F (2011). Microvascular bone grafting: A new long-term solution for intraosseous arteriovenous malformations of the mandible in children. Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery, 39(6):431-434.

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intraosseous arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) in the maxillofacial area are rarely reported in the current literature. These malformations have been associated with severe hemorrhage resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. The recommended gold standard treatment of AVMs is an endovascular embolization, combined with surgery. Especially in children, disease management remains a challenge for the surgeon due to the process of bone growth. AIM: In this report, we describe our experience with a microvascular bone graft as another possible surgical technique for the treatment of intraosseous AVMs in children. PATIENT AND METHODS: A 15-year-old boy was admitted to our department with a life-threatening hemorrhage due to an AVM of the left mandible. The attempt of an ordinary tooth extraction had lead to the emergency. Several embolizations and surgical interventions were required. Finally, a bony reconstruction with a microvascular bone graft from the right iliac crest was performed in order to achieve a normal form and function of the mandible. Postoperative recovery of the patient was unremarkable, and no recurrence was reported. Dental rehabilitation and a good esthetic outcome were achieved by insertion of dental implants. RESULTS: The performed interventions resulted in a complete anatomic and clinical cure. CONCLUSION: We suggest microvascular bone grafts from the anterior iliac crest as a valuable alternative in the long-term treatment of intraosseous AVMs, especially for extensive defects and in children.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
DDC:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:18 Feb 2011 13:05
Last Modified:27 Nov 2013 22:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1010-5182
Publisher DOI:10.1016/j.jcms.2010.05.004
PubMed ID:20832327

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