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Association between deposition of beta-amyloid and pathological prion protein in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease


Debatin, L; Streffer, J; Geissen, M; Matschke, J; Aguzzi, A; Glatzel, M (2008). Association between deposition of beta-amyloid and pathological prion protein in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Neurodegenerative Diseases, 5(6):347-354.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion diseases such as sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) share common features concerning their molecular pathogenesis and neuropathological presentation and the coexistence of AD and CJD in patients suggest an association between the deposition of the proteolytically processed form of the amyloid precursor protein, beta-amyloid (Abeta), which deposits in AD, and the abnormal form of the prion protein, PrP(Sc), which deposits in sCJD. METHODS: We have characterized sCJD patients (n = 14), AD patients (n = 5) and nondemented controls (n = 5) with respect to the deposition of PrP(Sc) and Abeta morphologically, biochemically and genetically and correlated these findings to clinical data. RESULTS: sCJD-diseased individuals with abundant deposits of Abeta present with a specific clinicopathological profile, defined by higher age at disease onset, long disease duration, a genetic profile and only minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in the cerebellum. CONCLUSION: The co-occurrence of pathological changes typical for sCJD and AD in combination with the inverse association between accumulation of Abeta and PrP(Sc) in a subgroup of sCJD patients is indicative of common pathways involved in the generation or clearance of Abeta and PrP(Sc) in a subgroup of sCJD patients.

BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and prion diseases such as sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) share common features concerning their molecular pathogenesis and neuropathological presentation and the coexistence of AD and CJD in patients suggest an association between the deposition of the proteolytically processed form of the amyloid precursor protein, beta-amyloid (Abeta), which deposits in AD, and the abnormal form of the prion protein, PrP(Sc), which deposits in sCJD. METHODS: We have characterized sCJD patients (n = 14), AD patients (n = 5) and nondemented controls (n = 5) with respect to the deposition of PrP(Sc) and Abeta morphologically, biochemically and genetically and correlated these findings to clinical data. RESULTS: sCJD-diseased individuals with abundant deposits of Abeta present with a specific clinicopathological profile, defined by higher age at disease onset, long disease duration, a genetic profile and only minimal amounts of PrP(Sc) in the cerebellum. CONCLUSION: The co-occurrence of pathological changes typical for sCJD and AD in combination with the inverse association between accumulation of Abeta and PrP(Sc) in a subgroup of sCJD patients is indicative of common pathways involved in the generation or clearance of Abeta and PrP(Sc) in a subgroup of sCJD patients.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Neuropathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute for Regenerative Medicine (IREM)
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:18 March 2008
Deposited On:03 Nov 2008 13:37
Last Modified:16 Aug 2016 10:13
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:1660-2854
Publisher DOI:10.1159/000121389
PubMed ID:18349519
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4646

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