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Desmosomal gene analysis in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy: spectrum of mutations and clinical impact in practice


Fressart, V; et al; Delacretaz, E; Keller, D (2010). Desmosomal gene analysis in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy: spectrum of mutations and clinical impact in practice. Europace, 12(6):861-868.

Abstract

AIMS: Five desmosomal genes have been recently implicated in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) but the clinical impact of genetics remains poorly understood. We wanted to address the potential impact of genotyping.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Direct sequencing of the five genes (JUP, DSP, PKP2, DSG2, and DSC2) was performed in 135 unrelated patients with ARVD/C. We identified 41 different disease-causing mutations, including 28 novel ones, in 62 patients (46%). In addition, a genetic variant of unknown significance was identified in nine additional patients (7%). Distribution of genes was 31% (PKP2), 10% (DSG2), 4.5% (DSP), 1.5% (DSC2), and 0% (JUP). The presence of desmosomal mutations was not associated with familial context but was associated with young age, symptoms, electrical substrate, and extensive structural damage. When compared with other genes, DSG2 mutations were associated with more frequent left ventricular involvement (P = 0.006). Finally, complex genetic status with multiple mutations was identified in 4% of patients and was associated with more frequent sudden death (P = 0.047).

CONCLUSION: This study supports the use of genetic testing as a new diagnostic tool in ARVC/D and also suggests a prognostic impact, as the severity of the disease appears different according to the underlying gene or the presence of multiple mutations.

AIMS: Five desmosomal genes have been recently implicated in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C) but the clinical impact of genetics remains poorly understood. We wanted to address the potential impact of genotyping.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Direct sequencing of the five genes (JUP, DSP, PKP2, DSG2, and DSC2) was performed in 135 unrelated patients with ARVD/C. We identified 41 different disease-causing mutations, including 28 novel ones, in 62 patients (46%). In addition, a genetic variant of unknown significance was identified in nine additional patients (7%). Distribution of genes was 31% (PKP2), 10% (DSG2), 4.5% (DSP), 1.5% (DSC2), and 0% (JUP). The presence of desmosomal mutations was not associated with familial context but was associated with young age, symptoms, electrical substrate, and extensive structural damage. When compared with other genes, DSG2 mutations were associated with more frequent left ventricular involvement (P = 0.006). Finally, complex genetic status with multiple mutations was identified in 4% of patients and was associated with more frequent sudden death (P = 0.047).

CONCLUSION: This study supports the use of genetic testing as a new diagnostic tool in ARVC/D and also suggests a prognostic impact, as the severity of the disease appears different according to the underlying gene or the presence of multiple mutations.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic and Policlinic for Internal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:24 Feb 2011 12:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:50
Publisher:Oxford University Press
ISSN:1099-5129
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.1093/europace/euq104
PubMed ID:20400443

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