UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Reversal of pathological pain through specific spinal GABAA receptor subtypes


Knabl, J; Witschi, R; Hösl, K; Reinold, H; Zeilhofer, U B; Ahmadi, S; Brockhaus, J; Sergejeva, M; Hess, A; Brune, K; Fritschy, J M; Rudolph, U; Möhler, H; Zeilhofer, H U (2008). Reversal of pathological pain through specific spinal GABAA receptor subtypes. Nature, 451(7176):330-334.

Abstract

Inflammatory diseases and neuropathic insults are frequently accompanied by severe and debilitating pain, which can become chronic and often unresponsive to conventional analgesic treatment. A loss of synaptic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn is considered to contribute significantly to this pain pathology. Facilitation of spinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission through modulation of GABA(A) receptors should be able to compensate for this loss. With the use of GABA(A)-receptor point-mutated knock-in mice in which specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes have been selectively rendered insensitive to benzodiazepine-site ligands, we show here that pronounced analgesia can be achieved by specifically targeting spinal GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha2 and/or alpha3 subunits. We show that their selective activation by the non-sedative ('alpha1-sparing') benzodiazepine-site ligand L-838,417 (ref. 13) is highly effective against inflammatory and neuropathic pain yet devoid of unwanted sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development. L-838,417 not only diminished the nociceptive input to the brain but also reduced the activity of brain areas related to the associative-emotional components of pain, as shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging in rats. These results provide a rational basis for the development of subtype-selective GABAergic drugs for the treatment of chronic pain, which is often refractory to classical analgesics.

Inflammatory diseases and neuropathic insults are frequently accompanied by severe and debilitating pain, which can become chronic and often unresponsive to conventional analgesic treatment. A loss of synaptic inhibition in the spinal dorsal horn is considered to contribute significantly to this pain pathology. Facilitation of spinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission through modulation of GABA(A) receptors should be able to compensate for this loss. With the use of GABA(A)-receptor point-mutated knock-in mice in which specific GABA(A) receptor subtypes have been selectively rendered insensitive to benzodiazepine-site ligands, we show here that pronounced analgesia can be achieved by specifically targeting spinal GABA(A) receptors containing the alpha2 and/or alpha3 subunits. We show that their selective activation by the non-sedative ('alpha1-sparing') benzodiazepine-site ligand L-838,417 (ref. 13) is highly effective against inflammatory and neuropathic pain yet devoid of unwanted sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development. L-838,417 not only diminished the nociceptive input to the brain but also reduced the activity of brain areas related to the associative-emotional components of pain, as shown by functional magnetic resonance imaging in rats. These results provide a rational basis for the development of subtype-selective GABAergic drugs for the treatment of chronic pain, which is often refractory to classical analgesics.

Citations

217 citations in Web of Science®
231 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

4 downloads since deposited on 18 Nov 2008
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:17 January 2008
Deposited On:18 Nov 2008 15:29
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:31
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0028-0836
Publisher DOI:10.1038/nature06493
PubMed ID:18202657
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4687

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF (Supplementary Information) - Registered users only
Size: 502kB
View at publisher
[img]
Filetype: PDF (Manuscript) - Registered users only
Size: 1MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations