UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The AMPA receptor subunits GluR-A and GluR-B reciprocally modulate spinal synaptic plasticity and inflammatory pain


Hartmann, B; Ahmadi, S; Heppenstall, P A; Lewin, G R; Schott, C; Borchardt, T; Seeburg, P H; Zeilhofer, H U; Sprengel, R; Kuner, R (2004). The AMPA receptor subunits GluR-A and GluR-B reciprocally modulate spinal synaptic plasticity and inflammatory pain. Neuron, 44(4):637-650.

Abstract

Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are densely expressed in the spinal dorsal horn, but their functional significance in pain processing is not understood. By disrupting the genes encoding GluR-A or GluR-B, we generated mice exhibiting increased or decreased numbers of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that AMPA receptors are critical determinants of nociceptive plasticity and inflammatory pain. A reduction in the number of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors and density of AMPA channel currents in spinal neurons of GluR-A-deficient mice is accompanied by a loss of nociceptive plasticity in vitro and a reduction in acute inflammatory hyperalgesia in vivo. In contrast, an increase in spinal Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in GluR-B-deficient mice facilitated nociceptive plasticity and enhanced long-lasting inflammatory hyperalgesia. Thus, AMPA receptors are not mere determinants of fast synaptic transmission underlying basal pain sensitivity as previously thought, but are critically involved in activity-dependent changes in synaptic processing of nociceptive inputs.

Abstract

Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors are densely expressed in the spinal dorsal horn, but their functional significance in pain processing is not understood. By disrupting the genes encoding GluR-A or GluR-B, we generated mice exhibiting increased or decreased numbers of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that AMPA receptors are critical determinants of nociceptive plasticity and inflammatory pain. A reduction in the number of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors and density of AMPA channel currents in spinal neurons of GluR-A-deficient mice is accompanied by a loss of nociceptive plasticity in vitro and a reduction in acute inflammatory hyperalgesia in vivo. In contrast, an increase in spinal Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors in GluR-B-deficient mice facilitated nociceptive plasticity and enhanced long-lasting inflammatory hyperalgesia. Thus, AMPA receptors are not mere determinants of fast synaptic transmission underlying basal pain sensitivity as previously thought, but are critically involved in activity-dependent changes in synaptic processing of nociceptive inputs.

Citations

117 citations in Web of Science®
124 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 27 Mar 2009
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:18 November 2004
Deposited On:27 Mar 2009 11:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:31
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0896-6273
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2004.10.029
PubMed ID:15541312

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations