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GenEthics and Religion


GenEthics and Religion. Edited by: Pfleiderer, Georg; Brahier, Gabriella; Lindpaintner, Klaus (2010). Basel: Karger.

Abstract

Human gene and cell technology is a diverse and rapidly evolving field of research. As genes represent the 'blueprint' of an organism, their analysis and manipulation is a challenge to our understanding of human nature. Stem cell research, genetic testing, gene therapy, therapeutic and reproductive cloning – all these fields of application have been raising fundamental ethical and religious-theological questions: When does human life begin? Should human beings be allowed to interfere with natural procreation or to manipulate the genome of their own species? Is genetic engineering tantamount to 'playing God'?

Based on the symposium 'GenEthics and Religion' held in Basel, Switzerland in May 2008, this volume examines the role religion can play in establishing ethical guidelines to protect human life in the face of rapid advances in biology and especially gene technology. It does so in a multidisciplinary way with contributions by philosophers, theologians, human geneticists, and several bioethicists representing the Christian, Jewish, Islamic and Buddhist perspectives. The essays illustrating a diversity of views and expressing the problems and self-critical reflectiveness of religious ethicists have been brought up to date and discuss the importance of religious ethics in society’s discourse on gene technology.

Human gene and cell technology is a diverse and rapidly evolving field of research. As genes represent the 'blueprint' of an organism, their analysis and manipulation is a challenge to our understanding of human nature. Stem cell research, genetic testing, gene therapy, therapeutic and reproductive cloning – all these fields of application have been raising fundamental ethical and religious-theological questions: When does human life begin? Should human beings be allowed to interfere with natural procreation or to manipulate the genome of their own species? Is genetic engineering tantamount to 'playing God'?

Based on the symposium 'GenEthics and Religion' held in Basel, Switzerland in May 2008, this volume examines the role religion can play in establishing ethical guidelines to protect human life in the face of rapid advances in biology and especially gene technology. It does so in a multidisciplinary way with contributions by philosophers, theologians, human geneticists, and several bioethicists representing the Christian, Jewish, Islamic and Buddhist perspectives. The essays illustrating a diversity of views and expressing the problems and self-critical reflectiveness of religious ethicists have been brought up to date and discuss the importance of religious ethics in society’s discourse on gene technology.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Beyond Playing God: Critical Religious GenEthics for Pluralistic Societies
Item Type:Edited Scientific Work
Communities & Collections:01 Faculty of Theology > Center for Ethics
08 University Research Priority Programs > Ethics
01 Faculty of Theology > Institute of Theology
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
230 Christianity & Christian theology
Language:German
Date:2010
Deposited On:04 Mar 2011 09:27
Last Modified:11 Jul 2016 07:25
Publisher:Karger
ISBN:978-3-8055-8973-4
Additional Information:e-ISBN: 978-3-8055-8974-1
Publisher DOI:10.1159/isbn.978-3-8055-8974-1

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