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Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute for human dentine in erosion/abrasion tests?


Wegehaupt, F; Gries, D; Wiegand, A; Attin, T (2008). Is bovine dentine an appropriate substitute for human dentine in erosion/abrasion tests? Journal of Oral Rehabilitation, 35(5):390-394.

Abstract

The study aimed to compare the dentine wear of primary and permanent human and bovine teeth because of erosion/abrasion and evaluate if bovine dentine is an appropriate substitute for human dentine in further erosion/abrasions tests. Dentine samples from deciduous molars and human third molars as well as from calves' and cattle's lower incisors were prepared and baseline surface profiles were recorded. Each day all samples were demineralized in 1% citric acid, tooth brushed with 100 brushing strokes with toothpaste slurry and stored in artificial saliva for the rest of the day. This cycle was run for 20 days. Afterwards, new surface profiles were recorded and dentine wear was calculated by a customized computer program. Dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion was not statistically, significantly different for human third molars and cattle's lower incisors (P = 0.7002). The dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion of deciduous molars and calves' lower incisors was significantly different (P < 0.0000). No statistically significant difference in the dentine wear of human third molars and cattle's lower incisors was observed, so that the use of cattle's lower incisors as substitute for adult human teeth for further investigations in erosion/abrasion studies could be accepted.

The study aimed to compare the dentine wear of primary and permanent human and bovine teeth because of erosion/abrasion and evaluate if bovine dentine is an appropriate substitute for human dentine in further erosion/abrasions tests. Dentine samples from deciduous molars and human third molars as well as from calves' and cattle's lower incisors were prepared and baseline surface profiles were recorded. Each day all samples were demineralized in 1% citric acid, tooth brushed with 100 brushing strokes with toothpaste slurry and stored in artificial saliva for the rest of the day. This cycle was run for 20 days. Afterwards, new surface profiles were recorded and dentine wear was calculated by a customized computer program. Dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion was not statistically, significantly different for human third molars and cattle's lower incisors (P = 0.7002). The dentine wear because of erosion/abrasion of deciduous molars and calves' lower incisors was significantly different (P < 0.0000). No statistically significant difference in the dentine wear of human third molars and cattle's lower incisors was observed, so that the use of cattle's lower incisors as substitute for adult human teeth for further investigations in erosion/abrasion studies could be accepted.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:27 Oct 2008 15:33
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:31
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0305-182X
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1365-2842.2007.01843.x
PubMed ID:18405276
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4742

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