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The role of the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) — pathway in derivation and maintenance of murine pluripotent stem cells


Graf, U; Casanova, E A; Cinelli, P (2011). The role of the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) — pathway in derivation and maintenance of murine pluripotent stem cells. Genes, 2:280-297.

Abstract

Developmental biology, regenerative medicine and cancer biology are more and more interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Pluripotency is maintained by a synergistic interplay between extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic circuitries, which allow sustainment of the undifferentiated and self-renewing state. Nevertheless, even though a lot of efforts have been made in the past years, the precise mechanisms regulating these processes remain unclear. One of the key extrinsic factors is leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) that is largely used for the cultivation and derivation of mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. LIF acts through the LIFR/gp130 receptor and activates STAT3, an important regulator of mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal. STAT3 is known to inhibit differentiation into both mesoderm and endoderm lineages by preventing the activation of lineage-specific differentiation programs. However, LIF activates also parallel circuitries like the PI3K-pathway and the MEK/ERK-pathway, but its mechanisms of action remain to be better elucidated. This review article aims at summarizing the actual knowledge on the importance of LIF in the maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

Developmental biology, regenerative medicine and cancer biology are more and more interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling pluripotency and self-renewal in stem cells. Pluripotency is maintained by a synergistic interplay between extrinsic stimuli and intrinsic circuitries, which allow sustainment of the undifferentiated and self-renewing state. Nevertheless, even though a lot of efforts have been made in the past years, the precise mechanisms regulating these processes remain unclear. One of the key extrinsic factors is leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) that is largely used for the cultivation and derivation of mouse embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells. LIF acts through the LIFR/gp130 receptor and activates STAT3, an important regulator of mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal. STAT3 is known to inhibit differentiation into both mesoderm and endoderm lineages by preventing the activation of lineage-specific differentiation programs. However, LIF activates also parallel circuitries like the PI3K-pathway and the MEK/ERK-pathway, but its mechanisms of action remain to be better elucidated. This review article aims at summarizing the actual knowledge on the importance of LIF in the maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Laboratory Animal Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:09 Mar 2011 16:00
Last Modified:17 Aug 2016 07:24
Publisher:MDPI Publishing
ISSN:2073-4425
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:10.3390/genes2010280
Official URL:http://www.mdpi.com/2073-4425/2/1/280/
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-47463

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