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Being playful and smart? The relations of adult playfulness with psychometric and self-estimated intelligence and academic performance


Proyer, Rene T (2011). Being playful and smart? The relations of adult playfulness with psychometric and self-estimated intelligence and academic performance. Learning and Individual Differences, 21(4):463-467.

Abstract

The study examines the relation between subjectively assessed adult playfulness and psychometric and selfestimated
intelligence in a sample of 254 students. As expected, playfulness existed widely independently
from psychometric intelligence. Correlations pointed in the direction of higher expressive playfulness and
numeric intelligence and lower creative playfulness and figural intelligence. However, the size of the
coefficients suggests that the results should not be over-interpreted. The same was true for self-estimates of
intelligence. Those scoring lower in the total score of all self-estimates (median split) yielded higher scores in
creative playfulness but those with higher self-estimates were higher in the silly-aspects of playfulness (i.e.,
childlike or unpredictable). Playfulness was associated with better academic performance (i.e., better grades
in an exam). Also, students who described themselves as playful were more likely to do the extra reading that
went beyond what was needed to pass the exam. This can be seen as first evidence of a positive relation
between playfulness in adults and academic achievement. Data are interpreted within current literature and
future research directions are given.

Abstract

The study examines the relation between subjectively assessed adult playfulness and psychometric and selfestimated
intelligence in a sample of 254 students. As expected, playfulness existed widely independently
from psychometric intelligence. Correlations pointed in the direction of higher expressive playfulness and
numeric intelligence and lower creative playfulness and figural intelligence. However, the size of the
coefficients suggests that the results should not be over-interpreted. The same was true for self-estimates of
intelligence. Those scoring lower in the total score of all self-estimates (median split) yielded higher scores in
creative playfulness but those with higher self-estimates were higher in the silly-aspects of playfulness (i.e.,
childlike or unpredictable). Playfulness was associated with better academic performance (i.e., better grades
in an exam). Also, students who described themselves as playful were more likely to do the extra reading that
went beyond what was needed to pass the exam. This can be seen as first evidence of a positive relation
between playfulness in adults and academic achievement. Data are interpreted within current literature and
future research directions are given.

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:11 Mar 2011 09:56
Last Modified:09 Jun 2016 09:20
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1041-6080
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lindif.2011.02.003

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