UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Oligoarthritis durch Tropheryma whipplei „Of bugs and joints“


Koligi, K; Mertz, D; Benz, D; Vogt, T; Bloemberg, G V; Winter, L; Tyndall, A; Battegay, M; Walker, U A (2010). Oligoarthritis durch Tropheryma whipplei „Of bugs and joints“. Der Internist, 52(7):884-888.

Abstract

Whipple’s disease is a rare, chronic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei, an ubiquitary gram positive bacterium. The disease is associated with a high mortality in absence of an antibiotic treatment. The disease can be detected in affected tissues and body fluids by light and electron microscopy, as well as by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Musculoskeletal symptoms such as arthralgia and arthritis frequently represent the first manifestation of this multi-system disease; typical subsequent symptoms are weight loss, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Symptoms of central nervous system involvement are present in 10–40% of cases. We report on a 67 year-old male with a history of migratory oligoarthritis over three decades in whom the causative agent was detected by PCR in synovial fluid only. This case illustrates that searches for the characteristic PAS-positive macrophages and PCR in biopsies from the duodenum may be insufficient and that diagnostic efforts should be complemented with PCR assays from affected tissues or body fluids. It is recommended that antibiotic treatment be carried out with an agent that penetrates well into the cerebrospinal fluid, e.g. ceftriaxone, followed by cotrimoxazole. Antibiotics should be maintained over several months to years. It is prudent to document the disappearance of the pathogen in the affected compartments prior to the discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy.

Abstract

Whipple’s disease is a rare, chronic infection caused by Tropheryma whipplei, an ubiquitary gram positive bacterium. The disease is associated with a high mortality in absence of an antibiotic treatment. The disease can be detected in affected tissues and body fluids by light and electron microscopy, as well as by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Musculoskeletal symptoms such as arthralgia and arthritis frequently represent the first manifestation of this multi-system disease; typical subsequent symptoms are weight loss, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. Symptoms of central nervous system involvement are present in 10–40% of cases. We report on a 67 year-old male with a history of migratory oligoarthritis over three decades in whom the causative agent was detected by PCR in synovial fluid only. This case illustrates that searches for the characteristic PAS-positive macrophages and PCR in biopsies from the duodenum may be insufficient and that diagnostic efforts should be complemented with PCR assays from affected tissues or body fluids. It is recommended that antibiotic treatment be carried out with an agent that penetrates well into the cerebrospinal fluid, e.g. ceftriaxone, followed by cotrimoxazole. Antibiotics should be maintained over several months to years. It is prudent to document the disappearance of the pathogen in the affected compartments prior to the discontinuation of the antibiotic therapy.

Citations

1 citation in Web of Science®
2 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 11 Mar 2011
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Other titles:Of bugs and joints: Oligoarthritis caused by Tropheryma whipplei
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2010
Deposited On:11 Mar 2011 15:06
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:52
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0020-9554
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00108-010-2741-z
PubMed ID:21046063

Download

[img]
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations