UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

EEG-BOLD correlations during (post-)adolescent brain maturation


Lüchinger, R; Michels, L; Martin, E; Brandeis, D (2011). EEG-BOLD correlations during (post-)adolescent brain maturation. NeuroImage, 56(3):1493-1505.

Abstract

The transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical stage in the human lifespan during which the brain still undergoes substantial structural and functional change. The changing frequency composition of the resting state EEG reflects maturation of brain function. This study investigated (post)adolescent brain maturation captured by two independently but simultaneously recorded neuronal signals: EEG and fMRI. Data were collected in a 20 min eyes-open/eyes-closed resting state paradigm. EEG, fMRI-BOLD signal and EEG-BOLD correlations were compared between groups of adults, age 25 (n = 18), and adolescents, age 15 (n = 18). A typical developmental decrease of low-frequency EEG power was observed even at this late stage of brain maturation. Frequency and condition specific EEG-fMRI correlations proved robust for multiple brain regions. However, no consistent change in the EEG-BOLD correlations was identified that would correspond to the neuronal maturation captured by the EEG. This result indicates that the EEG-BOLD correlation measures a distinct aspect of neurophysiological activity that presumably matures earlier, since it is less sensitive to late maturation than the neuronal activity captured by low-frequency EEG.

The transition from adolescence to adulthood is a critical stage in the human lifespan during which the brain still undergoes substantial structural and functional change. The changing frequency composition of the resting state EEG reflects maturation of brain function. This study investigated (post)adolescent brain maturation captured by two independently but simultaneously recorded neuronal signals: EEG and fMRI. Data were collected in a 20 min eyes-open/eyes-closed resting state paradigm. EEG, fMRI-BOLD signal and EEG-BOLD correlations were compared between groups of adults, age 25 (n = 18), and adolescents, age 15 (n = 18). A typical developmental decrease of low-frequency EEG power was observed even at this late stage of brain maturation. Frequency and condition specific EEG-fMRI correlations proved robust for multiple brain regions. However, no consistent change in the EEG-BOLD correlations was identified that would correspond to the neuronal maturation captured by the EEG. This result indicates that the EEG-BOLD correlation measures a distinct aspect of neurophysiological activity that presumably matures earlier, since it is less sensitive to late maturation than the neuronal activity captured by low-frequency EEG.

Citations

15 citations in Web of Science®
16 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

116 downloads since deposited on 22 Mar 2011
24 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Children's Hospital Zurich > Medical Clinic
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:22 Mar 2011 05:42
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2011.02.050
PubMed ID:21349336
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-47675

Download

[img]
Preview
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 6MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations