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Kunst mit Botschaft: Der Gold-Seide-Stoff für den Ilchan Abū Saʽīd von Iran (Grabgewand Rudolfs IV. in Wien) – Rekonstruktion, Typus, Repräsentationsmedium


Ritter, Markus (2010). Kunst mit Botschaft: Der Gold-Seide-Stoff für den Ilchan Abū Saʽīd von Iran (Grabgewand Rudolfs IV. in Wien) – Rekonstruktion, Typus, Repräsentationsmedium. In: Ritter, Markus; Korn, Lorenz. Beiträge zur Islamischen Kunst und Archäologie. Wiesbaden: Reichert, 105-135.

Abstract

A unique cloth of silk and gold with Arabic inscriptions praising the Ilkhan Abū Saʽīd “Būsaʽīd”), Mongol ruler of Iran (1316-35), survives in three pieces used for the burial garment of Rudolph IV at Vienna (d. 1365). Presenting some of the findings from a new study of this
textile, this article reconstructs the original cloth, draws attention to a specific type of striped design and discusses its context of use. In the reconstructed cloth, bold inscriptions in broad golden letters, alternating with a delicate repeat pattern, ran lengthwise from both short sides in opposite reading directions. Meeting at some point in the cloth, they divided it into two parts, raising questions about its use. While striped designs are well-known, this monumental type with large inscriptions may have been a new form, relating to Iranian textile traditions and ṭirāz inscriptions in Islamic art; contemporaneous Chinese art seems to have had no particular bearing on the motifs. In the cloth as a medium of representation, monumental inscriptions and gold may have visually communicated an identity, both Islamic and Mongol, of the Ilkhanid ruler.

A unique cloth of silk and gold with Arabic inscriptions praising the Ilkhan Abū Saʽīd “Būsaʽīd”), Mongol ruler of Iran (1316-35), survives in three pieces used for the burial garment of Rudolph IV at Vienna (d. 1365). Presenting some of the findings from a new study of this
textile, this article reconstructs the original cloth, draws attention to a specific type of striped design and discusses its context of use. In the reconstructed cloth, bold inscriptions in broad golden letters, alternating with a delicate repeat pattern, ran lengthwise from both short sides in opposite reading directions. Meeting at some point in the cloth, they divided it into two parts, raising questions about its use. While striped designs are well-known, this monumental type with large inscriptions may have been a new form, relating to Iranian textile traditions and ṭirāz inscriptions in Islamic art; contemporaneous Chinese art seems to have had no particular bearing on the motifs. In the cloth as a medium of representation, monumental inscriptions and gold may have visually communicated an identity, both Islamic and Mongol, of the Ilkhanid ruler.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Art with a message: The cloth of silk and gold for the Ilkhan Abu Sa'id (burial garment of Rudolph IV in Vienna) – reconstruction, type, medium of representation
Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Art History
Dewey Decimal Classification:700 Arts
Uncontrolled Keywords:Islamic art history Islamische Kunstgeschichte textile cloth-of-silk-and-gold Goldseidestoff Habsburg Rudolf IV. Abu Said Ilkhan Ilchan Mongol Mongolen Tabriz inscription Vienna funeral Grabgewand
Language:German
Date:2010
Deposited On:30 Mar 2011 13:07
Last Modified:27 May 2016 12:21
Publisher:Reichert
Number:2
ISBN:978-3-89500-766-8
Related URLs:http://www.reichert-verlag.de/pages/print02766.htm
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-47816

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