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Cone arrestin confers cone vision of high temporal resolution in zebrafish larvae


Renninger, S L; Gesemann, M; Neuhauss, S C F (2011). Cone arrestin confers cone vision of high temporal resolution in zebrafish larvae. European Journal of Neuroscience, 33(4):658-667.

Abstract

Vision of high temporal resolution depends on careful regulation of photoresponse kinetics, beginning with the lifetime of activated photopigment. The activity of rhodopsin is quenched by high-affinity binding of arrestin to photoexcited phosphorylated photopigment, which effectively terminates the visual transduction cascade. This regulation mechanism is well established for rod photoreceptors, yet its role for cone vision is still controversial. In this study we therefore analyzed arrestin function in the cone-dominated vision of larval zebrafish. For both rod (arrS ) and cone (arr3 ) arrestin we isolated two paralogs, each expressed in the respective subset of photoreceptors. Labeling with paralog-specific antibodies revealed subfunctionalized expression of Arr3a in M- and L-cones, and Arr3b in S- and UV-cones. The inactivation of arr3a by morpholino knockdown technology resulted in a severe delay in photoresponse recovery which, under bright light conditions, was rate-limiting. Comparison to opsin phosphorylation-deficient animals confirmed the role of cone arrestin in late cone response recovery. Arr3a activity partially overlapped with the function of the cone-specific kinase Grk7a involved in initial response recovery. Behavioral measurements further revealed Arr3a deficiency to be sufficient to reduce temporal contrast sensitivity, providing evidence for the importance of arrestin in cone vision of high temporal resolution.

Vision of high temporal resolution depends on careful regulation of photoresponse kinetics, beginning with the lifetime of activated photopigment. The activity of rhodopsin is quenched by high-affinity binding of arrestin to photoexcited phosphorylated photopigment, which effectively terminates the visual transduction cascade. This regulation mechanism is well established for rod photoreceptors, yet its role for cone vision is still controversial. In this study we therefore analyzed arrestin function in the cone-dominated vision of larval zebrafish. For both rod (arrS ) and cone (arr3 ) arrestin we isolated two paralogs, each expressed in the respective subset of photoreceptors. Labeling with paralog-specific antibodies revealed subfunctionalized expression of Arr3a in M- and L-cones, and Arr3b in S- and UV-cones. The inactivation of arr3a by morpholino knockdown technology resulted in a severe delay in photoresponse recovery which, under bright light conditions, was rate-limiting. Comparison to opsin phosphorylation-deficient animals confirmed the role of cone arrestin in late cone response recovery. Arr3a activity partially overlapped with the function of the cone-specific kinase Grk7a involved in initial response recovery. Behavioral measurements further revealed Arr3a deficiency to be sufficient to reduce temporal contrast sensitivity, providing evidence for the importance of arrestin in cone vision of high temporal resolution.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Molecular Life Sciences
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:arrestin, cone photoreceptor, phototransduction, retina, zebrafish
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:07 Apr 2011 07:28
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:54
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0953-816X
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2010.07574.x
PubMed ID:21299656
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-47868

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