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In their native range, invasive plants are held in check by negative soil-feedbacks


Zuppinger-Dingley, D; Schmid, B; Chen, Y; Brandl, H; van der Heijden, M G A; Joshi, J (2011). In their native range, invasive plants are held in check by negative soil-feedbacks. Ecosphere, 2(5):art54.

Abstract

The ability of some plant species to dominate communities in new biogeographical ranges has been attributed to an innate higher competitive ability and release from co-evolved specialist enemies. Specifically, invasive success in the new range might be explained by release from biotic negative soilfeedbacks, which control potentially dominant species in their native range. To test this hypothesis, we grew individuals from sixteen phylogenetically paired European grassland species that became either invasive or naturalized in new ranges, in either sterilized soil or in sterilized soil with unsterilized soil inoculum from their native home range. We found that although the native members of invasive species
generally performed better than those of naturalized species, these native members of invasive species also
responded more negatively to native soil inoculum than did the native members of naturalized species. This supports our hypothesis that potentially invasive species in their native range are held in check by negative soil-feedbacks. However, contrary to expectation, negative soil-feedbacks in potentially invasive species were not much increased by interspecific competition. There was no significant variation among families between invasive and naturalized species regarding their feedback response (negative vs. neutral). Therefore, we conclude that the observed negative soil feedbacks in potentially invasive species may be
quite widespread in European families of typical grassland species.

The ability of some plant species to dominate communities in new biogeographical ranges has been attributed to an innate higher competitive ability and release from co-evolved specialist enemies. Specifically, invasive success in the new range might be explained by release from biotic negative soilfeedbacks, which control potentially dominant species in their native range. To test this hypothesis, we grew individuals from sixteen phylogenetically paired European grassland species that became either invasive or naturalized in new ranges, in either sterilized soil or in sterilized soil with unsterilized soil inoculum from their native home range. We found that although the native members of invasive species
generally performed better than those of naturalized species, these native members of invasive species also
responded more negatively to native soil inoculum than did the native members of naturalized species. This supports our hypothesis that potentially invasive species in their native range are held in check by negative soil-feedbacks. However, contrary to expectation, negative soil-feedbacks in potentially invasive species were not much increased by interspecific competition. There was no significant variation among families between invasive and naturalized species regarding their feedback response (negative vs. neutral). Therefore, we conclude that the observed negative soil feedbacks in potentially invasive species may be
quite widespread in European families of typical grassland species.

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4 citations in Web of Science®
14 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Uncontrolled Keywords:biotic interactions; enemy release; invasive species; native range; naturalized species; plant invasions; plant–soil feedbacks; soil inoculation; soil sterilization
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:18 May 2011 10:19
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:55
Publisher:Ecological Society of America
ISSN:2150-8925
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1890/ES11-00061.1
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48089

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