UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Implications of high-resolution simulations on indirect dark matter searches


Pieri, L; Lavalle, J; Bertone, G; Branchini, E (2011). Implications of high-resolution simulations on indirect dark matter searches. Physical Review D, 83(2):023518.

Abstract

We study the prospects for detecting the annihilation products of dark matter (DM) in the framework of the two highest-resolution numerical simulations currently available, i.e., Via Lactea II and Aquarius. We propose a strategy to determine the shape and size of the region around the Galactic center that maximizes the probability of observing a DM signal, and we show that, although the predicted flux can differ by a factor of 10 for a given DM candidate in the two simulation setups, the search strategy remains actually unchanged, since it relies on the angular profile of the annihilation flux, not on its normalization. We present mock γ-ray maps that keep into account the diffuse emissions produced by unresolved halos in the Galaxy, and we show that, in an optimistic DM scenario, a few individual clumps can be resolved above the background with the Fermi-LAT. Finally, we calculate the energy-dependent boost factors for positrons and antiprotons and show that they are always of O(1), and, therefore, they cannot lead to the large enhancements of the antimatter fluxes required to explain the recent PAMELA, ATIC, Fermi, and HESS data. Still, we show that the annihilation of 100 GeV weakly interacting massive particles into charged lepton pairs may contribute significantly to the positron budget.

We study the prospects for detecting the annihilation products of dark matter (DM) in the framework of the two highest-resolution numerical simulations currently available, i.e., Via Lactea II and Aquarius. We propose a strategy to determine the shape and size of the region around the Galactic center that maximizes the probability of observing a DM signal, and we show that, although the predicted flux can differ by a factor of 10 for a given DM candidate in the two simulation setups, the search strategy remains actually unchanged, since it relies on the angular profile of the annihilation flux, not on its normalization. We present mock γ-ray maps that keep into account the diffuse emissions produced by unresolved halos in the Galaxy, and we show that, in an optimistic DM scenario, a few individual clumps can be resolved above the background with the Fermi-LAT. Finally, we calculate the energy-dependent boost factors for positrons and antiprotons and show that they are always of O(1), and, therefore, they cannot lead to the large enhancements of the antimatter fluxes required to explain the recent PAMELA, ATIC, Fermi, and HESS data. Still, we show that the annihilation of 100 GeV weakly interacting massive particles into charged lepton pairs may contribute significantly to the positron budget.

Citations

69 citations in Web of Science®
68 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

52 downloads since deposited on 19 Feb 2012
21 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute for Computational Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:530 Physics
Language:English
Date:January 2011
Deposited On:19 Feb 2012 11:51
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:55
Publisher:American Physical Society
ISSN:1550-7998 (P) 1089-4918 (E)
Publisher DOI:10.1103/PhysRevD.83.023518
Related URLs:http://arxiv.org/abs/0908.0195
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48254

Download

[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (Version 1)
Size: 3MB
View at publisher
[img]
Preview
Content: Accepted Version
Filetype: PDF (Version 2)
Size: 3MB

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations