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Territory and electoral rules in post-communist democracies


Bochsler, D (2010). Territory and electoral rules in post-communist democracies. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Abstract

The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalisation as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and shows how party nationalisation can increase our understanding of electoral systems. Electoral systems are the central pillar of every constitutional design. To understand their effect on party systems, we need to consider the issue of territory. Electoral system studies have attempted to explain the format of party systems in post-communist democracies. Usually, proportional representation allows for large multi-party systems and single-seat district elections leading to two-party competition, yet studies on post-communist Europe seem to reveal something different. Are post-communist democracies so chaotic that they surpass the limits of the electoral system school? This study considers the importance of territory: it matters not only how many votes parties get, but also where they get them. The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalization as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and, by extending common models of electoral systems, it shows how party nationalization can increase our understanding of electoral systems

The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalisation as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and shows how party nationalisation can increase our understanding of electoral systems. Electoral systems are the central pillar of every constitutional design. To understand their effect on party systems, we need to consider the issue of territory. Electoral system studies have attempted to explain the format of party systems in post-communist democracies. Usually, proportional representation allows for large multi-party systems and single-seat district elections leading to two-party competition, yet studies on post-communist Europe seem to reveal something different. Are post-communist democracies so chaotic that they surpass the limits of the electoral system school? This study considers the importance of territory: it matters not only how many votes parties get, but also where they get them. The book extends research on the territorial structure of party systems (party nationalization) to 20 post-communist democracies. It explains party nationalization as a consequence of ethnically oriented politics, and, by extending common models of electoral systems, it shows how party nationalization can increase our understanding of electoral systems

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18 citations in Web of ScienceĀ®

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Monograph
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Language:English
Date:2010
Deposited On:23 Jun 2011 12:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:56
Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan
Number of Pages:232
ISBN:978-0-230-24827-4
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1057/9780230281424
Related URLs:http://opac.nebis.ch/F/?local_base=EBI01&con_lng=GER&func=find-b&find_code=090&request=001970619

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