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U1 snRNA-mediated gene therapeutic correction of splice defects caused by an exceptionally mild BBS mutation


Schmid, F; Glaus, E; Barthelmes, D; Fliegauf, M; Gaspar, H; Nürnberg, G; Nürnberg, P; Omran, H; Berger, W; Neidhardt, J (2011). U1 snRNA-mediated gene therapeutic correction of splice defects caused by an exceptionally mild BBS mutation. Human Mutation, 32(7):815-824.

Abstract

Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a multisystem disorder caused by ciliary defects. To date, mutations in 15 genes have been associated with the disease and BBS1 is most frequently affected in patients with BBS. The use of homozygosity mapping in a large consanguineous family allowed us to identify the splice donor site (SD) mutation c.479G>A in exon 5 of BBS1. Clinically affected family members show symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) but lack other primary features that would clearly support the diagnosis of BBS. In agreement with this exceptionally mild BBS1-associated phenotype, we did not detect obvious ciliary defects in patient-derived cells. SDs are bound by the U1 small nuclear RNA (U1), a process that initiates exon recognition during splicing. The mutation described herein interferes with U1 binding and induces aberrant splicing of BBS1. For a gene therapeutic approach, we have adapted the sequence of U1 to increase its complementarity to the mutated SD. Lentiviral treatment of patient-derived fibroblasts with the adapted U1 partially corrected aberrant splicing of endogenously expressed BBS1 transcripts. This therapeutic effect was dose-dependent. Our results show that the adaptation of U1 can correct pathogenic effects of splice donor site mutations and suggest a high potential for gene therapy.Hum Mutat 32:815-824, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a multisystem disorder caused by ciliary defects. To date, mutations in 15 genes have been associated with the disease and BBS1 is most frequently affected in patients with BBS. The use of homozygosity mapping in a large consanguineous family allowed us to identify the splice donor site (SD) mutation c.479G>A in exon 5 of BBS1. Clinically affected family members show symptoms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP) but lack other primary features that would clearly support the diagnosis of BBS. In agreement with this exceptionally mild BBS1-associated phenotype, we did not detect obvious ciliary defects in patient-derived cells. SDs are bound by the U1 small nuclear RNA (U1), a process that initiates exon recognition during splicing. The mutation described herein interferes with U1 binding and induces aberrant splicing of BBS1. For a gene therapeutic approach, we have adapted the sequence of U1 to increase its complementarity to the mutated SD. Lentiviral treatment of patient-derived fibroblasts with the adapted U1 partially corrected aberrant splicing of endogenously expressed BBS1 transcripts. This therapeutic effect was dose-dependent. Our results show that the adaptation of U1 can correct pathogenic effects of splice donor site mutations and suggest a high potential for gene therapy.Hum Mutat 32:815-824, 2011. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Molecular Genetics
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:19 Jul 2011 08:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:57
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1059-7794
Publisher DOI:10.1002/humu.21509
PubMed ID:21520335
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48697

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