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Effects of iatrogenic hypercortisolism on gallbladder sludge formation and biochemical bile constituents in dogs


Kook, P H; Schellenberg, S; Rentsch, K M; Reusch, C E; Glaus, T M (2012). Effects of iatrogenic hypercortisolism on gallbladder sludge formation and biochemical bile constituents in dogs. Veterinary Journal, 191(2):225-230.

Abstract

An association between gallbladder mucoceles and hypercortisolism (HC) was recently described in dogs. Because the formation of a mucocele from clear bile without the transitional formation of microprecipitates appears unlikely, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of iatrogenic HC on sludge formation and changes in the biochemical composition of bile. Bile samples from 6 dogs obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis before (day 0), during (days 28, 56, and 84), and after (days 28p, 56p, and 84p) oral administration of hydrocortisone (8mg/kg every12h) were analysed for calcium, cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations and pH. In addition the gallbladder was examined ultrasonographically for sludge. Six dogs receiving a placebo served as controls. Although gallbladder sludge was observed in all treated dogs at day 56, it was also noted in 50% of control dogs, and no significant differences were seen between groups at any sampling time. Bilirubin and cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly and reversibly during treatment, and calcium concentration showed a similar trend. Bile pH was consistently slightly alkaline during iatrogenic HC, whereas it was slightly acidic in control animals. A 3-month period of iatrogenic HC does not lead to ultrasonographically detectable gallbladder sludge or to an increase in bile constituents that are commonly implicated in sludge formation in humans.

An association between gallbladder mucoceles and hypercortisolism (HC) was recently described in dogs. Because the formation of a mucocele from clear bile without the transitional formation of microprecipitates appears unlikely, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of iatrogenic HC on sludge formation and changes in the biochemical composition of bile. Bile samples from 6 dogs obtained by percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis before (day 0), during (days 28, 56, and 84), and after (days 28p, 56p, and 84p) oral administration of hydrocortisone (8mg/kg every12h) were analysed for calcium, cholesterol and bilirubin concentrations and pH. In addition the gallbladder was examined ultrasonographically for sludge. Six dogs receiving a placebo served as controls. Although gallbladder sludge was observed in all treated dogs at day 56, it was also noted in 50% of control dogs, and no significant differences were seen between groups at any sampling time. Bilirubin and cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly and reversibly during treatment, and calcium concentration showed a similar trend. Bile pH was consistently slightly alkaline during iatrogenic HC, whereas it was slightly acidic in control animals. A 3-month period of iatrogenic HC does not lead to ultrasonographically detectable gallbladder sludge or to an increase in bile constituents that are commonly implicated in sludge formation in humans.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:03 Aug 2011 15:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:57
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2011.01.004
PubMed ID:21316991
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48796

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