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It is not how many votes you get, but also where you get them: Territorial determinants and institutional hurdles for the success of ethnic minority parties in post-communist countries


Bochsler, D (2011). It is not how many votes you get, but also where you get them: Territorial determinants and institutional hurdles for the success of ethnic minority parties in post-communist countries. Acta Politica, 46(3):217-238.

Abstract

Electoral rules have long been held as important for the success of new political parties, but research has neglected the dimension of territory in this equation. This article argues that the territorial structure of social groups, in interaction with the electoral system, makes a crucial difference for the ability of new parties to enter parliament. In district-based electoral systems, social groups that are highly concentrated face much lower hurdles with an own party than groups that are spread throughout the country. The argument is tested on a novel database on ethnic minority groups from post-communist countries in Europe, including 123 minorities in 19 countries. To test hypotheses with complex interaction effects and binary variables, Qualitative Comparative Analysis appears as the most suitable method. After controlling for size and special minority-relevant provisions in the electoral systems, there is strong confirmation for the hypothesised effect.

Electoral rules have long been held as important for the success of new political parties, but research has neglected the dimension of territory in this equation. This article argues that the territorial structure of social groups, in interaction with the electoral system, makes a crucial difference for the ability of new parties to enter parliament. In district-based electoral systems, social groups that are highly concentrated face much lower hurdles with an own party than groups that are spread throughout the country. The argument is tested on a novel database on ethnic minority groups from post-communist countries in Europe, including 123 minorities in 19 countries. To test hypotheses with complex interaction effects and binary variables, Qualitative Comparative Analysis appears as the most suitable method. After controlling for size and special minority-relevant provisions in the electoral systems, there is strong confirmation for the hypothesised effect.

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5 citations in Web of Science®
9 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Uncontrolled Keywords:Electoral systems, new parties, ethnic parties, post-communist countries
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:02 Aug 2011 08:36
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 14:57
Publisher:Palgrave Macmillan
ISSN:0001-6810
Additional Information:This is a post-peer-review, pre-copyedit version of an article published in Acta Politica. The definitive publisher-authenticated version Bochsler, D (2011). It is not how many votes you get, but also where you get them: Territorial determinants and institutional hurdles for the success of ethnic minority parties in post-communist countries. Acta Politica, 46(3):217-238. is available online at: http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ap/index.html
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1057/ap.2010.26
Related URLs:http://www.palgrave-journals.com/ap/journal/v46/n3/index.html
Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-48852

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