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Effect of oral melatonin on the procoagulant response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men: a randomized placebo-controlled study


Wirtz, P H; Bärtschi, C; Spillmann, M; Ehlert, Ulrike; von Känel, R (2008). Effect of oral melatonin on the procoagulant response to acute psychosocial stress in healthy men: a randomized placebo-controlled study. Journal of Pineal Research, 44(4):358-365.

Abstract

Acute mental stress is a potent trigger of acute coronary syndromes. Catecholamine-induced hypercoagulability with acute stress contributes to thrombus growth after coronary plaque rupture. Melatonin may diminish catecholamine activity. We hypothesized that melatonin mitigates the acute procoagulant stress response and that this effect is accompanied by a decrease in the stress-induced catecholamine surge. Forty-five healthy young men received a single oral dose of either 3 mg melatonin (n = 24) or placebo medication (n = 21). One hour thereafter, they underwent a standardized short-term psychosocial stressor. Plasma levels of clotting factor VII activity (FVII:C), FVIII:C, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and catecholamines were measured at rest, immediately after stress, and 20 min and 60 min post-stress. The integrated change in D-dimer levels from rest to 60 min post-stress differed between medication groups controlling for demographic and metabolic factors (P = 0.047, eta(p)(2) = 0.195). Compared with the melatonin group, the placebo group showed a greater increase in absolute D-dimer levels from rest to immediately post-stress (P = 0.13; eta(p)(2) = 0.060) and significant recovery of D-dimer levels from immediately post-stress to 60 min thereafter (P = 0.007; eta(p)(2) = 0.174). Stress-induced changes in FVII:C, FVIII:C, fibrinogen, and catecholamines did not significantly differ between groups. Oral melatonin attenuated the stress-induced elevation in the sensitive coagulation activation marker D-dimer without affecting catecholamine activity. The finding provides preliminary support for a protective effect of melatonin in reducing the atherothrombotic risk with acute mental stress.

Acute mental stress is a potent trigger of acute coronary syndromes. Catecholamine-induced hypercoagulability with acute stress contributes to thrombus growth after coronary plaque rupture. Melatonin may diminish catecholamine activity. We hypothesized that melatonin mitigates the acute procoagulant stress response and that this effect is accompanied by a decrease in the stress-induced catecholamine surge. Forty-five healthy young men received a single oral dose of either 3 mg melatonin (n = 24) or placebo medication (n = 21). One hour thereafter, they underwent a standardized short-term psychosocial stressor. Plasma levels of clotting factor VII activity (FVII:C), FVIII:C, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and catecholamines were measured at rest, immediately after stress, and 20 min and 60 min post-stress. The integrated change in D-dimer levels from rest to 60 min post-stress differed between medication groups controlling for demographic and metabolic factors (P = 0.047, eta(p)(2) = 0.195). Compared with the melatonin group, the placebo group showed a greater increase in absolute D-dimer levels from rest to immediately post-stress (P = 0.13; eta(p)(2) = 0.060) and significant recovery of D-dimer levels from immediately post-stress to 60 min thereafter (P = 0.007; eta(p)(2) = 0.174). Stress-induced changes in FVII:C, FVIII:C, fibrinogen, and catecholamines did not significantly differ between groups. Oral melatonin attenuated the stress-induced elevation in the sensitive coagulation activation marker D-dimer without affecting catecholamine activity. The finding provides preliminary support for a protective effect of melatonin in reducing the atherothrombotic risk with acute mental stress.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Uncontrolled Keywords:cardiovascular disease, coagulation, hemostasis, melatonin, psychological stress
Language:English
Date:May 2008
Deposited On:18 Dec 2008 13:52
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:32
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0742-3098
Funders:Research grant 2004 from the University of Zurich (Forschungskredit 2004, to PHW)
Additional Information:The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com. For full bibliographic citation, please refer to the version available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Publisher DOI:10.1111/j.1600-079X.2007.00535.x
PubMed ID:18410584
Permanent URL: http://doi.org/10.5167/uzh-4886

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